Bulletin Board Of Inspired Quotes


Last week I had a moment of inspiration while spending some time in our Resource Centre. Just like you; just like anyone I suppose, that moment came where I thought, “I wonder if other people will think as much of this idea as I do; it has a lot of potential.”

Now ours is a place to go exclusively for those in receipt of Ontario Works or Ontario Disability Support Program social assistance programs. So essentially those who make use of it may be there for a number of reasons. Some look for jobs, housing, attend workshops and seminars or get help finding community services. Others use it as a place to network, socialize, have someone they can trust hear them out, make a phone call or use the fax/copy services. We attract a variety of purposes, even though our centre is at present limited to these two groups.

At the rear of our drop-in Resource Centre are 5 boards we’ve typically used in the past to put up the latest job postings. Observation of these boards has suggested that while some people continue to scan them for employment possibilities, more and more users tend to sit down at one of the 20 computers we have and look for jobs themselves; finding them as they are posted throughout a day.

This has led our team to re-examine the effectiveness of having all 5 of these boards filled with jobs and duplicating what people find themselves. I stood looking at an empty board the other day and thought about what I or we could do with that board other than job opportunities. Then it came to me. I’d search online for motivational quotes and stick them up on the board with the invitation to take whatever a person wanted or needed. But would it work?

I began by turning to the internet and went to Bing. Sorry Google, but I’m a Bing man. I searched, “Quotes with pictures” and clicked on Images which gave me the result of photographs and illustrations with various motivational or insightful quotes overlaid on them. These I scanned, choosing the ones I thought might particularly appeal to the audience they would attract.

Characteristically, the people who would stand before this board might be unemployed, anxious, perhaps lacking career direction, feeling despair, loneliness, isolation, depression, dwindling hope, low self-esteem, medically and mentally fragile and frustrated. On the other hand they may also be resilient, determined to succeed, need support, adaptable, hopeful, open to change and thankful.

When I found a quote I liked and hoped might speak personally to someone in a public space, I saved the photo to the computer I was on and then copied and pasted the photo/quote to a Word document I called, “Quotes with pictures”. Yes, painfully obvious; but that’s what file names are supposed to be right?

Then it was left to me to print several pages of these gather quotes with pictures and make sure they were of various sizes, so they’d appeal more to the eye as a collage and not looking too institutionalized. With 7 or 8 pages of these quotes, I cut them all to size and pinned them to the board, taking care to ensure they were randomly placed by theme, size and image. In the center of the board I placed, “Please Take What You Need”; an invitation to help yourself to anyone looking.

That was just Friday last and yesterday combined. With anything new, you’ve got two choices; direct people who don’t notice to what you’ve done or allow people to discover what’s new on their own. In a place like ours, people can get robotic; come in, do their thing, leave, return, repeat. I opted to let people go the self-discovery way. After all, I didn’t want people to feel they had to compliment me on the board, nor did I want people to feel they should take something just to please me.

I was delighted to later have a fellow come up to me with 7 or 8 of the quotes in his hand and double-check to see if he really could take them with him or if he was expected to photocopy what he took and replace them. When I told him to help himself; that they were there for the taking, he smiled and appeared quite happy. I could have asked why those 7 or 8. I could have looked at them to know which ones to replace. I could have started data collecting to see what speaks to people and then use that information to start conversations with people on whatever they wanted to talk about. I didn’t do any of these things. I replaced the quotes with more.

If you like this idea or some resemblance of it, feel free to duplicate it all or in part and adapt it to your space and your audience. You can also search by topic: leadership, hope, goal setting, courage, team work, strength, wisdom – the list is only as long as your own imagination. There’s other ways of arriving at the same finished products too; you could make your own quotes and insert them as text over your own photos. You could also use a colour printer. Or what about one colour photo in a sea of black and white ones – just to see the impact?

Conversation starter or source of inspiration; my share with you to start August 2017.

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LinkedIn Notifications


When I open LinkedIn I can see right away that there’s some notifications waiting for me to open. The more connections you have, the more likely you are to have a number of these, and so with quite a few connections, these notifications come daily.

As I move to click on the small red dot on the notifications image (in this case what reminds me of a school bell), I wonder less and less what the notification will actually turn out to be. This is because more often than not, the notifications are to either wish one of my connections a happy birthday or to congratulate them on a work anniversary or perhaps starting a new job.

Now I’m not under any obligation to actually do anything with those notifications. I can ignore them and choose to move on with whatever else I want to do, or I can click and up comes a standard message I can send as is or edit. Typically the standard message is, “Happy Birthday”, “Congratulations on the new job” or “Congratulations on your anniversary”. With a second click I can send the message as is or as I say edit the message by sending an additional thought of my own.

Now me, I always choose to acknowledge the event connected with my connections. I know however that this is not a practice shared by others, and I’m actually not going to suggest or advise you as a reader of this article one way or the other. I’m going to share with you why I personally do think this is a practice I will continue to engage in however. I would think the only reason I’d stop to do this would be if a number of my connections contacted me and requested I stop. It would seem to me however that this practice must be working for the majority of LinkedIn users or LinkedIn itself would disable this functionality and stop promoting the practice of acknowledging events going on with ones’ connections.

One thing I have to say is that like so many other users of this social media platform, I have contacts I know intimately, others I know well, some I know moderately and some I’ve accepted as connections whom never really entered into dialogue with beyond initiating or accepting a connection. My response to these people will vary when I see a notification. To the extent I know the person and/or the actual time I have on my hands at a given moment dictates what I choose to do. Not much time and I send the standard LinkedIn proposed message; more time and I add a personal note of my own.

The real question of course is why. Why do this at all? Of what value is there in sending any acknowledgement? Well to me, I believe it’s one small way of maintaining a relationship with the person. Take the person I know well but not intimately. Maybe I’ve exchanged some messages back and forth over the years, provided some feedback on something they’ve said or they’ve commented on a blog of mine. Acknowledging their birthday costs me nothing but 4 seconds and aren’t they worth that? I think they are.

Should my contact change jobs I’d also want to know about this and I wouldn’t expect they’d individually notify all their connections about the change. This service provided by LinkedIn is a quick way to get the news out and new jobs are always cause for celebration. I think most people enjoy being congratulated and so I do so.

What of the person then that I don’t know all that well but who is nonetheless a connection of mine? I still take those few seconds to click on the, “Say happy birthday” message. Here I might opt to just send the standard greeting. Again, it requires so little effort I can’t help but think if I really value the connection why wouldn’t I give them 4 seconds of my time?

You might wonder why I’d even have a connection that I don’t really know that well or whom I don’t exchange much conversation with. Perhaps for you this is a bigger question. Well, yes there are people who just go about collecting connections at random and think it’s a race to have the highest number possible. I’m not one of those. I do think that in addition to building a network of people in my field, there is value in knowing people in other lines of work; connections where the benefits are not immediately obvious. I’m laying the groundwork for the future, and if they initiate a request with me, perhaps they are looking to benefit from me as a connection. So it’s not always what I can leverage from someone but more often than not what I might do for them.

Clicking on that ‘Congratulate so-and-so on their work anniversary’ is also important I think just because it’s nice to do. There’s no strings attached to sending the congratulatory message, I’m not asking for anything. It does from time-to-time result in a few messages back and forth; a check-in if you will and my relationship with that person gets some attention and nurturing.

So there’s some of my argument for the LinkedIn Notifications feature and it’s value. Sometimes it’s all the little things that cumulatively make a difference.

Networking: The Payoff Of Persistence


Whether you’re looking for employment or successfully employed, you’ve undoubtedly heard and know the value of networking. That being said, it is surprising that many people don’t do it well themselves; often not truly networking with others until necessity demands it. Like many things, necessity might  at that point force you to do it, but without the practice, you’re unlikely to be at your best.

So what exactly is networking and how do you both get started and do it well? Networking is having conversations with people where information is exchanged and relationships established and nurtured. It is often associated with advancing one’s own career but this latter part need not be part of some formal definition. Many people network for the purpose of solely learning more about the best practices in their field, or mentoring others without thinking to spin these into self promotions and advancement.

Today I’ve got a meeting set up for noon with one of my LinkedIn connections. This is a face-to-face meeting which could be a one-time only event. It has come about because she initiated contact, indicated she was relatively new to the area and has not had the success she’d hoped for in finding employment so far. Her request for either a meeting or a suggestion of someone else to contact in her field that might assist her is how she started. She’s taken initiative, reached out, and only time will tell if she’s satisfied or not with the outcome. It is however how networking begins.

Networking however has its payoffs. It can be so much more than a conversation. Last night I met with another person who reached out also via LinkedIn initially. This was our second face-to-face meeting. This time we talked about progress she was making, where she was in terms of her career thought process, looked at ways to strengthen her resume when applying and she shared a little of what transpired with others she was meeting with. During this second conversation, I also got some valuable feedback on some ideas I’m considering for the future and she took a real interest in my journey too. It was the best of networking; each person getting and giving for the benefit of both of us.

What is transpiring in the meeting above is a mutual investment in this relationship, rather than a one-way, “it’s all about me because I’m the one without a job” mentality. When both people feel they are benefitting from a conversation, each is invested to a higher degree.

Now the payoff of networking. This time I share with you the success story of a woman with whom I had the distinct pleasure of assisting in her search for meaningful employment. She initiated a dialogue back in January of this year with a gentleman she’s known for almost 15 years, but this time she reached out specifically with employment in mind. That initial networking conversation led to multiple conversations, even an invitation to attend a networking event together as his guest. Just yesterday she got in contact with me to say he himself has hired her on to work with him in his own business.

The experiences of these three women all demonstrate the value of taking the initiative to reach out and network. While much has changed in how we go about finding employment over the years, who you know is still a major key factor in being successful. How do you get to know people if you fail to reach out to anyone you don’t currently know?

Social media platforms such as LinkedIn are great for developing connections, but it still amazes me how many people decline invitations to connect with people they don’t know. Sure there are people who are just clicking away connecting with people for the sole purpose of increasing their numbers. That’s not networking however; that’s a popularity exercise. Connecting with famous people is also not truly networking. You’re unlikely to have an actual conversation with them, but you’ll get their thoughts in a one-way broadcast and you’ll get their name among your contacts if that holds meaning for you.

Here’s some ideas for you to consider acting upon; and let me make it clear that ‘acting upon’ should be your goal. For starters, initiate connection requests to the following people: those who work where you might like to also work or those who work in the same line of work you’re pursuing. You may come across people with profiles that peak your interest and spark some genuine curiosity or affinity with whom you’d like to know better. What might they share with you that would help you find passion yourself in what you do? What might they tell you that would help you get where they are or give you insights into the company or field you’re wanting to join?

Once connected with these people, do more than just count them as a connection. Reach out with an email or message and thank them for agreeing to be a connection. Tell them what attracted them to you and ask if there is the possibility of either meeting face-to-face, having a phone conversation or an online chat.

Be prepared for those that will say yes and those who will decline. Have some questions ready and be prepared to give as well as get. Make it worthwhile for both you and them.

Work your network.

The Roles We Play: A Good Exercise


Throughout our personal and professional lives, we take on different roles, becoming more or less important to those with whom we interact. We are a son or daughter to our parents, perhaps a brother or sister if we have siblings. We have been or continue to be students to those who have taught or teach us now. If and when we are employed, we are a colleague, co-worker and employee. Should we be out of work but looking, we are a job seeker.

In our work locations we have different roles of course. In addition to being an employee, we also have a specific job title. We are a Clerk, Sales Representative, Custodian, Labourer or Attendant for example. In addition to these titles, we may be the go-to person for some expertise we possess. We might be in the role of Mentor, Supervisor, Support Staff, Reception, Guide or Leader. Merging these roles we are a Custodial Supervisor, a Reception Clerk or Sales Leader.

Others see us and place varying values on us as individuals in the roles we play. While someone might value us as an indispensable colleague, it’s probable others who hold a differing view of our value. It’s also fair and accurate to say that others perception of us and our role can change over time. Where they saw us as a mentor or tutor in helping them get started, there comes a time when they see us as their equal; their partner or peer. We might come to value our Supervisor over time, changing our view of them and / or their role.

So it is safe to say that we have a number of roles we are simultaneously playing throughout our lives. How often do you pause to consider all the roles you play? Right now; at this present time, you are probably more aware of the role you play (or want to play) with respect to some relationships than you are of others. If you have a child who is expecting their own first child, you may be so excited at your future role of Grandparent, that you share your current role as an Expectant Grandparent. It’s as if you can’t wait for the role to be official, so you create one role that relies on a future event, (the birth of the grandchild) to make your new title and role a reality.

There can be times at work when the role we see ourselves playing, and the role others would like us to play differ. We may be content to play the role of the one who likes to work in isolation and with autonomy. However we may find ourselves being encouraged or assigned the roles of team leader, mentor or advisor. Or where we once worked happily in a large space with walls, we might find ourselves moved to where there are no walls, offices and cubicles, requiring us to be more sociable and engaging. We may have to clarify our role if a chatty person sees us in the role of Socializer and we don’t want that role.

So what does this role awareness do for us? It can be of tremendous value in achieving a measure of happiness if we know a role we want to play, leading us to acquiring the skills, experience and connections we’ll need to make that desired role a reality. So if you come to value the role of leadership and being legitimately seen and valued as a Leader, you look for opportunities to lead, building one experience at a time. You then turn your growing experience as a Leader into greater opportunities citing earlier experiences as your new-found qualifications.

Conversely, if you are unhappy or dissatisfied in your workplace, examining the role you have and the role you’d like might illuminate your discontent. You may wish to be perceived as a Leader, but if your colleagues don’t see you in that role, you may be consistently frustrated or disappointed. If you’ve ever looked at someone and thought, “I’d like to do their job”, or “I’d be good in the role”, you get the idea. What you’re really doing is seeing yourself in another role and realizing your desire for it. If it’s appealing to the point where you want it bad enough, move to position yourself to take advantage. If that role is scary or unpleasant, (as in, “I’d die if I had to give a presentation like they do!”) you’re not going to move in that direction.

A good exercise both individually and in groups is to take a sheet of paper and list all the roles you and others have played both in the past and in the present. We are Customers when we buy, Browsers when we just look. We are Riders on the bus, Residents in our apartments, Clients perhaps with the utility companies, Friends of our friends. Some of us will have short lists, others long lists. Some of us will look at others lists and realize there’s more to add on our own. Knowing our roles can be a boost to our self-esteem, see ourselves as connected and valued, and give us direction as we move next to identifying the roles we’d like to have in the future.

Listing and talking about why future roles appeal to us gives insight into the skills and experiences we may wish to acquire.

Why Do You Want To Connect?


LinkedIn; a professional networking, social media tool. Everybody you speak with these days seems to tout networking as essential to job searching, moving up, staying relevant etc. It’s a logical question therefore to ask why you are wanting to connect with someone if you extend the invitation. I know I like to know.

Think pre-LinkedIn for a moment. Imagine you’re checking your voicemail and there is a message from someone you don’t personally know, asking to get together. You’d no doubt pause for a moment and ponder the reason why.

“Had a message today from someone named Tom Bradley. Wants to get together.”

“What for?”

“That’s what I’d like to know, He didn’t say.”

“Well you’ll just have to ask him when you speak with him.”

That kind of exchange might be somewhat the norm. If he left a number you’d likely ring him back and find out how he knows you and the reason for meeting. If you have a mutual friend, he likely tell you that the friend suggested he speak with you if that was the case and about what. Imagine however that you agreed to meet at a nearby pub without really knowing the reason for meeting – just go with me for a moment on this. Wouldn’t your brain be trying to find out the reason for the meeting the longer it went on? Wouldn’t you just come out and ask? It would be bizarre in that scenario if you eventually asked and he replied, “Nothing really, just thought it good to meet you.”

Such an exchange would make you cautious about future phone messages from people you don’t know wanting to get together for a chat. Who has time for this?

So it’s curious that in 2015 and with the social media experience we have, that you may have received invites from people who use the standard, “Hi __________. I’d like to connect with you on LinkedIn”, and nothing more. If like me you have clicked the accept button, you may find out in a subsequent email why they wanted to connect or you may have had no other correspondence. So why did they want to connect?

Now let’s not be too harsh and judgemental. Some people have been told to network and think that means having 500+ connections. They don’t necessarily know what to do with those numbers, but it looks impressive to others if they have such a number. I for one am glad the public view stops at 500. It would appear otherwise to be a race to see who has the most connections, instead of what are you doing with all those connections.

Now you might of course want to connect with a person because you read something interesting in one of the group discussions that they posted which sparked your imagination. You may also have scoured LinkedIn searching for others who have similar job titles to your own in an effort to build up a relevant network of people you share employment with.

Perhaps too you are interested in working for a specific company and one of the strategies you are deploying is to connect with employees of that company so you can get some inside information, tips, advice or suggestions on how best to maximize your employment chances. Good for you if you do.

There are some people too who are impressed with the words on someone’s profile as they describe themselves; what they believe, their philosophy and motivation, how they go about their work, their past experiences etc. Like a magnet, some use their summary sections and job titles to draw in their audience and make connections that way. Again I say good for you if you do.

The point is know WHY you want to connect with someone, and find out WHY someone wants to connect with you. Now I don’t always follow my own advice. Just this weekend I had two requests and clicked on the accept button without then sending an email to ask why. I was hurried, should have waited to do it properly but didn’t.

If you ask someone why they wanted to connect with you, that information could be very useful. Maybe it is your tagline, your title, where you work etc. It’s like the initial scenario all over again but updated to 2015 – why do you want to connect? If you get enough people telling you it’s because you sound interesting or you could be influential etc., whatever the reason is you’ll know what in your profile is attracting people to you. Conversely, if few people are connecting with you and you’d like more, evaluate the effectiveness of your profile by looking at the profile of others like you.

I suppose too there are some users who want to be ‘connected’ with the big thinkers, the famous, the elite. While they might be interesting to read I agree, you won’t find Sir Richard Branson or others like him among my connections. Well if he asks me to connect I’ll let you know but I would scratch my head and wonder WHY he wanted to connect with me!

One reason I connect with others in my field is to share ideas, learn how others work, best practices, new ways of doing things and it’s give and take. I might one day help a peer with an open ear and the next reach out myself.

Why do you connect?

With A Little Help From My Friend


Readers of this blog on a regular basis know that the content is focused on helping people with job advice. I want to share with you something that happened yesterday in my personal life however which could translate down the road to professional help because people often ask me how one gets started establishing a relationship.

Two weeks ago my wife and I had four trees cut down at the back of our property, and while the tree-cutters sawed the trunks into 3-5 foot sections, that’s a lot of solid pieces and smaller branches to move from backyard to front driveway through a foot and a half of snow. That situation led me to take my snow blower and make a path. Great idea until the machine wouldn’t move forward or back at the end of the ploughing.

Now not being a mechanical guy, I was left with a machine which would turn on and blow snow, but I’d have to manual push the machine forward to use it if I wanted to, and that really isn’t how these machines are designed to be used. No, they are supposed to move forward as you engage the forward gears and you just guide the machine along.

Take it to a dealer for service? My first idea too. However, transporting a machine isn’t as easy as it might sound at first, not when you’ve got a Smartcar! As luck would have it, it hasn’t snowed much since that day, and a shovel has been all I’ve needed to clear a little snow. Thank you Mother Nature! Still, getting it fixed brings peace of mind for when the snows do come, and I suspect we’ve got some more in store.

Back to those trees on our property. My wife arranged with a co-worker of hers to have her come and take the wood away as she heats her home with wood. A great idea for all involved. She takes the wood saving me from having to pay someone to take it away, and she gets free fuel. Not only for burning apparently, she can use the bigger pieces for making items out of as ash is a sought after wood for her. We help her, she helps us.

So over the weekend, I hauled logs and branches out of the backyard along my well-trodden path, and she and I hauled them into her vehicle and she made several trips. Turns out during our discussions that my wife mentions to me that this co-worker of hers fixes her own tractor. Fixes her own tractor eh? Maybe she’d know something about my snow blower problem.

Pretty soon she’s flat on the garage floor with her tools, taking a plate off the machine to get at the problem. Me? I’m standing by in case she needs anything; she looks so happy down there why would I lie on the ground and ruin her fun? And she does enjoy tackling this kind of problem. Apparently she changed brakes at 10 years old, and her parents would only allow her to get her driving licence after she could rotate the tires on both their cars! Yes the woman is handy.

Needless to say, she and I discovered the problem was a sheared off pin on the axle. I bought it at the hardware store and uh, yes, she installed it. No shame there for me. She’s good. Did it work? Absolutely. So now the machine goes as it should, and she’s found a way to say thanks for the free wood.

So what’s this got to do with jobs and employment? Well I’m an Employment Counsellor and she’s a Social Services Caseworker. We work with the same kind of clientele but in two different municipalities. We knew each other before but only on a superficial level. Now we’ve spent some time in conversation and I know more of her and she of me. On its own it may not seem like much. However, this weekend sets up the possibility of some future working relationship helping one another out in our work.

You see you can’t always immediately tell where and how you might be of service to someone or want to ask for their help. If you only go about establishing relationships with people to get something from them, you’ll be building a one-sided relationship and by only taking not giving you’ll be avoided. Word gets around. The best relationships are give and take, and it’s best to connect with people when you don’t immediately need something from them. Asking for help later actually means more and someone is likely to give more to you if you have a relationship first.

I don’t know for sure today if I’ll be in some professional capacity to help her out down the road. It’s possible that I could help her apply for a job, or maybe help her son out when he’s ready to look for work. Might be a suggestion to help a client when she’s out of ideas too. Who knows? A relationship however has been established.

Whether it’s through LinkedIn, other social media or in-person, establish relationships with people around you and get connected. You’ll find that by being connected, giving and taking is beneficial for both you and those with whom you get to know. Get connected now so if and when you do ask for help professionally, the person of whom you ask will be more inclined to assist. Thanks Christine.

Using Your LinkedIn Network


Only because my reading audience extends beyond LinkedIn, let me first inform you if you don’t already know, that LinkedIn is a social media platform. On it, people post their professional profile, network with others, and explore job postings, post jobs, discuss issues pertinent to groups they are involved in and brand themselves.

Now just as Facebook has friends and Twitter has followers, LinkedIn has contacts; and it’s these contacts that I want to speak about today. Or rather, I want to know what if anything you are doing with your contacts.

After you create your profile, one of the key steps is start building your network. Many people will start with people they know; co-workers, people they regularly speak with in other organizations, professional contacts they do business with. Then at some point, you might decide to expand your network and try to connect with people who have similar job titles to your own in other towns, cities, provinces, states or countries.

This last part puzzles some people. After all why what might you have to gain by connecting with someone who does something similar to you half way ’round the world? In reality what you get out of such a relationship would largely depend on what your goal is and how much you take responsibility for initiating and nurturing the relationship. Doesn’t that sound like it’s true whether you are talking about someone around the world or just down the block?

Now me personally, I’ve found that I’ve had conversations with people; each conversation with a varying purpose than others from a number of perspectives. Sometimes people approach me and ask me to look over their resume. Other times they want to ask what I think of their profile, or to ask me something about how to get into the field of Social Services in general or become an Employment Counsellor specifically. Not as often, people reach out to me and ask me if they can be of some help in some way to me.

The question as to ‘why’ to network in the first place really comes down to what would you like to know or contribute. ‘Getting’ and ‘giving’ in the best of relationships is a two-way thing where you’re contributing as much as you are taking. Oh sure there will be people on LinkedIn who are in it only for themselves and what they can get out of others, but isn’t that true of people everywhere? The way I see it, I’ve got a career that makes me very happy and provides a lot of satisfaction. If I can therefore help out others and they don’t offer anything in return, that’s just my way of giving back.

The opportunity to help other people sometimes comes when people knock on your door to collect bottles for fundraisers (a local hockey team did this at my home on Saturday), or a youth organization gives you an apple for a financial donation, or possibly donating used clothing to a non-profit group. But it can also come in the form of donating your knowledge, your expertise, your experience in a mentoring capacity.

In addition to this, you might be after a new job. Once you’ve identified the company you are interested in working for, you might want to look up people via LinkedIn who work there now. Checking out their profiles could be a tremendous advantage for you in getting to know what people actually do there, what their backgrounds are including education, skills, causes they support etc. By reaching out to some of these people, you might find someone who would be willing to speak with you about the opportunity you want; how it came about, and what qualities not on the posting might be best to put forward.

Then there are discussion groups. Discussion groups are numerous and can focus on a specific group of people such as resume writers, or can be broad in scope such as people talking about professional development. You can search groups to find others with similar interests to your own and join a group, or you can initiate a group on your own and define the participation guidelines. Once you are in a group, your involvement could be only to read the thoughts of others or it could be to contribute on a regular basis to discussions, or anything in between.

When you do speak with others around the globe, you get perspectives and outlooks on topics that might alter or support your own point of view. You might find a best practice in the field you work in being done in England and you decide to try it out in Peru. You could be going about your business in Papua New Guinea and want to respond to a request for help from someone living in Iceland.

So how do you – YES YOU – utilize your contacts? Maybe you connect with people and never actually exchange emails or message each other at all. By sharing how you use your network and how you contribute to it, you can spur others to action who are perhaps very interested in actively engaging with others but don’t know where to start.

So what I’m asking you readers to do is take a moment or two and share what your experience has been in working with your connections on LinkedIn. It would be most appreciated I’m sure.