Fed Up Being Unemployed


Okay let’s start with the premise that you’re fed up. I mean you’ve grown so frustrated with trying to get a meaningful job that pays well that it’s left you confused on how to succeed and bitter. It seems no matter what you tried in the past, no matter who you applied to for a job, in the end the result was the same; you’re not wanted.

Seems to me that hearing the message, “Just keep trying” rings kind of hollow. How many times can you be expected to keep at it hoping for a better result? So you give up. Then after having packed it in you start feeling that it’s worth it to try again. Why? Usually it’s because the life you’ve got at the moment isn’t the one you want for yourself; you deserve better and you’re motivated to try again until you ultimately succeed or you give up once more.

Maybe you’d be open to hearing a few words of encouragement? If so, I’d like to offer you some. I suppose the first thing I’d like to say is that it is a good sign that you aren’t content to keep living the way your are now. That feeling that you want more is the seed of Hope that’s buried deep in your core. ‘Hope’ my dear reader, is at the core of so many people’s thoughts who push off from some known shore for the great journey’s they embark on. Hope is what causes them to leave the safe and known for the uncertainty and yet-to-be discovered.

Now keeping with that image of some adventurer embarking on a journey; the early stages of a journey involve traveling through the norm. The sailor who sets to some unknown land far away first has to get beyond the waters that are well chartered. The hiker deviating from some known path had to first hike what they knew to get to the point where they chose something previously passed up on.

It’s the same with you and your job search. You rely on what you know when it comes to looking for a job until you come across some better way of going about it. This makes absolute sense. However, just like the hiker and the explorer decided at some point to do something they’d never before done, it also stands to reason that you should do something you’ve never done if you expect the results to be more satisfying than you’ve experienced. Going about looking for a meaningful job the way you’ve gone about it in the past is likely to end with similar results; results you don’t want to experience again.

It’s important to realize that you’re not at fault or to blame for going about things the way you are; even if you later realize a number of mistakes you are made. After all, until someone introduces a better way, a more effective way of getting you where you want to be, the only way you’d have succeeded entirely on your own is through trial and error, until you lucked out on whatever works. That seems pretty high risk and could take a long time.

So it seems like you have a choice to make; do things the way you’ve always done them assuming this is how everybody goes about looking for work or, open yourself up to getting help and direction from someone who knows a better way. That ‘better way’ by the way, is likely going to involve some effort on your part in two ways. One, you have to pause long enough to be open to learning the new way and two you have to be willing to give it a shot and carry out what you learn.

Keep something in mind will you? When you’re learning something new you will likely feel the urge to just get going and apply, apply, apply! But throwing your résumé around everywhere hasn’t worked to this point has it? Pausing to learn, being taught something new isn’t  everybody’s idea of a good time. You might be the kind of person that finds sitting down and being taught how to go about looking for work in 2017 is really pushing your limits. Do it anyhow. Seriously; you want a different result don’t you? Sure you do. This is the price you pay for success.

Look you deserve a decent job. You probably aren’t going to end up running some major corporation or discovering the cure for Cancer. That you want to improve your lot in Life however, do something you find personally meaningful and make a future that’s better than the present is commendable. And if I may add, you’re worth it; we all are.

You should seriously think then about reaching out for help. Where to start though? Check in with just about any Social Services organization in your local community. If you’re not in the right place, a few phone calls will likely get you pointed in the right direction. Best news is that the help you need is likely free. Sit down with open ears and a good attitude and do something you haven’t done yet; give yourself over to their expertise. If it works, great. If the chemistry doesn’t work, try someone else.

When you decide to improve things and then act, you’re already becoming the successful person you envision.

 

 

A Key Mistake Frustrated Jobseekers Make


Your own experience with job searching could be that it doesn’t take you long to find the right kind of employment. I can recall times in my life when applying for work was rather easy and it seemed like every job I applied to I was granted an interview; but that was back in the 80’s.

These days, looking for work has changed dramatically. With more people unemployed, the emergence of technology (especially with the rise of online applications and applicant tracking software) and many more jobs with unique titles than at any time in history, I’d be greatly surprised if you didn’t find it increasingly frustrating.

No matter what job or career you are after, it’s understandable at some point that you start to wonder if the position you are chasing is the problem. The thoughts that nag at your consciousness are, “I just need a job; any job!”, “What other jobs can I do?” “Will I ever work again?” Pretty soon you find yourself questioning your qualifications, skills and experience as with the passing of time these are getting further and further outdated.

It’s around this time that some people make what is in my opinion – a poor decision. This decision is made at a time when they are vulnerable, not thinking clearly and their self-confidence is battered and bruised. The decision I’m talking about is going from a very streamlined and focused job search to a completely wide open buck shot job search.

Rather than gradually expanding on the jobs or career originally set out to obtain, the person widens their job search to include all manner of jobs. This dramatic change in approach is extremely dangerous even if in the immediate short-term it seems like a good move.

First of all you’ve probably got other people alerted to your job search and keeping their ears and eyes open. You don’t want to confuse those people and have them stop looking to help you by telling them you are now just looking for anything. They may be making inquiries on your behalf wit their own contacts and the companies they work for and feel less inclined to vouch for your abilities and interest if they find out you’re no longer committed to a specific career or field.

Next consider the possibility of landing some job you applied to out of sheer desperation. So now you’re working as a Barista for a large coffee company chain making minimum wage instead of being a Production Manager in the Food Service Industry. While it felt great to find jobs you could apply to and to have received a positive call offering you an interview, you wonder why it didn’t feel as wonderful when they actually offered you the job itself. And here, on your third day, you’re already starting to wonder, “Is this it? Is this my life now? What have I done?”

Of course there’s nothing wrong with a job as a Barista for those who seek it out as a desirable position. There’s nothing wrong too with expanding your job search when you either can’t find jobs to apply to that are an exact match for your qualifications and interests or you are having zero success in getting interviewed for. The real art of the thing is to expand the job search to include jobs which are similar or close to the job you ideally want, but not so much that you lose your focus.

Now you’ll get varying opinions on exactly how much time and effort you should put into looking for that ideal job. Some advice you hear may be to keep your focus 100% on your dream job and make no compromises. Others might suggest you set some arbitrary deadline such as three or six months; and if you’re unsuccessful, only then widen your job search.

For me personally, I would have to know you, the job you’re after, the market for that job in the community you live in, whether it’s entry, mid or a senior level job you’re after. I’d have to know you too and your attitude, financial health, stamina for a long job search, emotional and mental health needs in order to advise you personally on how long to commit to the job you’re ideally after.

Consider that when you are so ticked off you’re expanding on what you’ll look for, you may need to do so in order to pay your rent or mortgage, car insurance payments, gas or public transit money and of course eating well and staying healthy. Others out of work have significant savings set aside that they can utilize to offset the impact of a lengthy job search.

My general advice however is that before you go from a structured and focused job search to, “I’ll take anything”, just broaden your narrow job search goal a little. Can you for example consider taking a job in the same field, even if it’s not your dream job? If you did, you’d be getting somewhat relevant experience and would be able to apply for internal jobs.

If you can identify the company you want to work for long-term, can you apply for and accept an entry-level position (even part-time) doing something completely different but at least for the same employer? This could also give you the chance to become known, network and see internal jobs.

All the best with your decision-making to come.

 

Sustaining A Full-Time Job Search


If you are out of work, it’s likely that you’ve heard at one person remind you that looking for a job is a full-time job itself. I imagine there are times you actually go at it with a high degree of determination too, but if we’re totally honest here, you probably would acknowledge that you’re not actually job searching 7 hours or more a day, 5 days a week, 4 weeks or more a month.

This isn’t a criticism of your effort, nor meant to be a jolt to get going and take things seriously. It’s extremely rare to find anyone who can reach and maintain such a high level of intensity a full-time job search requires. After all, there are going to be setbacks, rejections, employers who won’t even acknowledge your application, resumes and cover letters to write, additional costs to get around and….well….let’s not overdue the obvious and just cause you even more stress. The bottom line is that it’s challenging to go at any one thing full-time all the time without some measure of progress.

The key in my mind to staying focused and energized during a job search lies in the variety of activities you actually undertake during each day. This I believe is where so many who look for employment fail miserably; especially when they are working on a job search independently. Allow me to explain.

From my observations and discussions both with job searchers in person and via the internet, many people go about looking for work in the following way: 1) look for work on a job website, 2) make a resume for the job, 3) send off the resume, 4) repeat. After doing this for some time, the same people lament that there are no more jobs to apply to that they are qualified for, so they stop the job search out of frustration until the next day and see if there are more new jobs to apply to. Many of these people are looking for new websites, thinking that there must be some websites that have many different jobs, but try as they may; they just find the same jobs in a multitude of different places.

The problem with the above isn’t that the person is looking for different websites, it’s that sitting in front of the computer scouring the web for jobs isn’t part of their job search; it’s their entire job search activity.

You’ll find yourself more motivated and the unemployment period much shorter if you go about looking for work using a variety of activities rather than just one. So in addition to sitting down in front of a computer, I’d suggest adding the following to your job search:

  • Compile your references
  • Contact previous employers for openings
  • Research companies you want to work for
  • Use LinkedIn to connect to company employees
  • Update your LinkedIn profile
  • Sign up with a Temp agency in your field
  • Schedule a little fun time during your day
  • Get out of the house and network
  • Exercise your body and your mind
  • Hydrate with water and snack on health foods
  • Give an updated resume to your references
  • Write a thank you note to your references
  • Clean up your social media web pages
  • Take a WHMIS or First Aid course

Now, there are many, (And I do mean many) other things you can do to round out your job search. This list is actually very short. You should also use your phone and call up some employers directly and take the initiative to request a short 20 minute meeting where you go on a fact-finding mission and become the interviewer. This is an information interview and you’re not actually looking for them to interview and hire you but rather, you’re networking, getting some insights into the field and will later use those insights to improve your chances of employment.

Short-term courses like a first aid course will add to the section on your resume where you’re listing your professional development, and provide you with tangible evidence that you are in fact accomplishing something during your job search. In a future interview, if you’re asked what you’ve been doing since your last job, you can point to this and say you’ve updated some skills. Yes this training will cost you some money; it will cost you more to do nothing however so think of this as an investment in yourself.

A variety of activities keeps you fresh and your brain stimulated. Schedule your day into a routine where you check your email at the beginning, middle and end of the day. Build in some short breaks to read a chapter or two of a book you enjoy. At least once a week, get out to some networking activity; a training event, drop in to an Employment office for some people contact. The suggestion I’m making is to tackle your job search using a variety of activities so your brain stays stimulated as you move from one thing to another instead of expecting yourself to do the same one or two things for hours on end day after day and remain committed.

Varying what you do to look for work isn’t any different from varying what you’d do in a job during the day. Employers build in formal breaks so their employees return to their work with energy and focus so you should too when looking for work.

 

 

Taking A Job You Don’t Want


Many people have accepted jobs which truth be told, they weren’t all that keen on in the first place. Perhaps it was after a long job search that appeared to be going nowhere and the constant rejection was too disheartening. Maybe it was a desperation for money to pay bills, or just a short-term filler job until something better came up.

Taking a job you don’t want can either be a terrible mistake or an excellent idea; it’s essential for your self-esteem and how you perceive yourself after accepting it that you clearly understand the difference.

First a situation that makes taking a job you don’t really love an excellent idea. Suppose your dream job requires you to own a reliable vehicle. Up to this point, you’ve managed to get along quite nicely using public transit or just walking everywhere and you lack the funds to buy one right away. Taking a short-term job outside your desired field is a good idea. Such an entry-level job will be easier to obtain than the position you’ve been really striving for, so the money will flow quicker into your hands. You can put aside money for the car, and therefore better compete for the job you really want faster. When you quit that job it won’t affect your reputation as its outside your field.

On the other hand, a terrible mistake can be made by the job seeker who becomes desperate and frustrated with a prolonged job search. Instead of gradually broadening the kinds of jobs they will look at, they leap into the, “I’ll do anything” mode, and before they know it, they’ve interviewed and accepted a job that is a long way from what they originally set out to do.

Now the consequence of this kind of misguided action is that while the person has a job, they will be immediately unhappy with it, question why on earth they accepted it, and know they’ve made a poor decision. How can this be you ask, when only a few days before they were adamantly stating they’d take anything? The truth is that a few days ago they didn’t have a job at all, so any job is an improvement. Now that they have a job, they want a better job; a better fit.

It’s the validation really that they were seeking. After all those rejections, any job seeker would welcome someone out there in a position to hire pegging them as desirable and needed. When someone says come in for the interview, they reason that any interview is good practice. When the job offer is made, they feel grateful for the interviewers confidence in them, and feel obligated then to say yes. Problem is that walking out the door of the company after accepting, they feel they’ve made a mistake, the job is wrong, and instead of feeling relief, they feel conflicted.

In many ways, applying for jobs that are just bad fits is understandable. How long should you hold out and go for the perfect job anyhow? And if you do broaden your search, should you go from looking for the perfect job to considering an excellent job? Then how long do you go from looking for an excellent job to a very good job? A good job? An okay job? Too many people go from looking for their dream job to an okay job right away. That’s the critical error.

If you can find some value in the jobs you are looking for you can rationalize your actions. So maybe the job would: 1) put current work experience on the resume, 2) give you future references, 3) be the new, ‘last job you worked at’ especially replacing your current last job if you’ve been fired, 4) get  you back in the routine of sticking to a schedule or 5) build your self-esteem if it’s been years since you had paid employment.

Settling in to the wrong job does run the risk of stalling your skill development in the areas you need to keep up with in your ideal field. So in other words, driving a taxi won’t help with your accounting skills if that’s your dream job. The taxi gig will bring you money, but it’s likely you’ll sit there driving thinking, “Oh no, what have I done? How did I end up behind the wheel?”

It’s essential in my opinion to see that we are all different. What is right for me may not be for you and therefore the choices we make might be right for both of us yet very different. I’ve taken jobs in the past I knew were entirely wrong from the beginning, but there was a purpose in those jobs at the time which helped me justify those moves to myself and my family. They were short-term jobs and served our needs so I did them well.

When considering a job outside your field, realize that’s it’s not a life sentence. You can still break free of that job and return to seeking your career of choice but with a little less desperation having some income in your pocket.

A word to you if you know someone who is working in a survival job. You can’t know all their private thoughts and past circumstances that brought them to their present reality. Therefore tread respectfully when you feel the urge to tell them what they should be doing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juggling And Job Searching?


Trying to focus 100% of your energy on a job search is good advice for anyone. How is it possible however, to do exactly that when a person is trying to cope with other issues? Be it moving, an upset Landlord, hunger, a dysfunctional family etc., life doesn’t always throw us one convenient issue at a time to deal with.

This thing called, “Life” is much easier to handle for many of us than it is for others. Oh to be sure we’ve all got things that worry us and require our attention. Seldom does a person only have one thing going on that they need to focus on.

I have a clientele in my professional job by day who are recipients of social assistance. There are amongst this general population, repeating issues and barriers to employment that crop up again and again – not with every single person to be sure – but the same issues arise with alarming frequency. The most obvious one is a lack of money, and so many other issues are tied to this shortage of income.

Anyone who has been involved in a full-time job search will tell you that transportation is a must. It is however, increasingly difficult for a person on a limited income to either fill up a tank of gas if they own a car, or to purchase a monthly bus pass in order to get around. Out of sheer necessity a person has to therefore choose wisely the places they’ll go to get help, even to get to a place with the internet from which to job search in the first place. Yes even access to the internet which so many of us take for granted in 2015 is a luxury item many can’t afford.

One other issue many of us are increasingly concerned about is the rising cost of quality foods. Fruit, vegetables, meat, dairy products etc. are all rising dramatically. A sustained job search requires energy, and we fuel ourselves with the foods we consume. A lack of income means many on social assistance find themselves expected to tackle their job search with vigor and enthusiasm but are doing it on processed foods, food bank supplements and whatever they might get in the way of donations.

Another issue that can get in the way of a productive job search is the issue of family and social support. It’s always easier and generally more productive to have people behind you who support you in your job search. So imagine yourself under the pressure to get a job and having strained relationships, (if any at all) with your mom and dad, your sisters or brothers and extended family. I hear a number of people talk about their dysfunctional family life who are looking for work. “I don’t talk to them”, “They think I’m a failure”, “They don’t understand why I won’t just take any job.” These kind of comments reveal a huge hurt that rob a person of the ability to solely focus on a job with a supportive team behind them.

Of course having a stable residence from which to take refuge from a frustrating job search is key. You can I believe with only slight effort picture what it would be like to try to look fresh and vibrant all day when you meet people who could shorten your job search when you’ve had an interrupted nights sleep every night for the last month where you live. Be it shady landlords who do renovation work in your unit and leave the place a mess, annoying neighbours or co-tenants that you have to endure but don’t feel you can actually trust when you go out, there are a lot of issues people face that cause stress.

Securing employment solves some of these issues. The income from a job allows one to eat better and more often, move to unit or area which is in a better environment. Income also permits a person to start repaying accumulated debts, stops the collectors from phoning daily, and yes might even allow a person to buy the occasional round of drinks for friends. That’s a nice change instead of having to come up with reasons why you can’t join your friends or feel guilty because you’ve always been on the receiving end.

A job search has its natural highs and lows. Many refer to a job search like a roller coaster ride. The only issue I have with this analogy is that before getting on any roller coaster, most of us stand and watch it first. We see how long it lasts and how high and steep the ride is before we get on and gauge our ability to handle it. Imagine being able to look at your job search at the outset and seeing how many months or years you’d be, ‘on’ it and the numerous ups and downs you’d have. Most of us assume it’ll be a short ride at first and can’t imagine the endurance it’s really going to take.

We all have to juggle multiple issues during a job search and some of us have skills in doing so while others never get the hang of it. When you meet someone job searching, good advice is to find out how many balls they already have in the air before giving them more things to juggle if you expect them to be successful.

Job Searching And Mental Health


If you are so very fortunate that your personal experiences of looking for work have been short-lived until you landed your job, you probably won’t be able to identify with the frustration people feel when in a prolonged job search. “What’s the big deal? Just keep trying and get working!’

Oh if only it were that simple. There are two basic realities of a job search for anyone; the things you can control and the things you can’t. The real key to understanding why some feel job searching is easy and others find it so intensely stressful still ultimately comes down to the above two realities, but the things one can and cannot control vary from person to person. This variance between people is often at the crux of extending or withholding sympathy and empathy for those in long drawn-out searches.

Such things one can’t control are the number of jobs employers need filled, the application process and the length of the application process. So let’s say we agreed on those three things to start with. We can’t make employers hire more people, whether an employer has us apply in-person, on-line etc. nor their choice to conduct one or a series of interviews prior to making a hiring decision. Fair enough.

Beyond this, are there other things we cannot control in a job search? For some the answer is yes and for others it’s no. And this variance, this difference of opinion, is where some experience anxiety, frustration and immense pressure while others do not. Consequently those who feel a person should be able to have control over every thing else will have little patience dealing with people who claim to have little control over other factors.

We all handle challenges differently do we not? Take for example being rejected for a job one really wanted. We all might feel let down, disappointed and frustrated. Why is though that this period of time is brief for some and extremely long for others? If some of us can snap out of it, roll up our sleeves and look for other positions to apply to, surely we all have that capacity don’t we? So isn’t it just a question of willpower and attitude? Perhaps and perhaps not. Are there some other factors beyond attitude and willpower (things we can control) which we are not acknowledging?

What about say, mental illness? Surely mental illness is not something one can control as for example ones attitude. Mental illness is not something that is readily identifiable by those we meet nor in fact sometimes by those actually experiencing it. Suppose you awoke one morning with a rash on your arm. You could look at it and say, “Gee I appear to have a rash on my arm. I best get that looked at.” Others you met would say, “I see you have a rash on your arm, here let me help you. Have you had that looked at?”

Now suppose however you awoke one morning feeling down, lethargic and had a prevailing feeling of sadness for reasons that were not immediately clear. Would you look in the mirror and say, “Gee it appears I’ve got abnormal anxiety and depression this morning, I should book an appointment with a Mental Health Counsellor.” And when you met others would they say, “Ah, I see you’re depressed and having some crippling mental health issues beyond your ability to cope with. Have you had that looked at?” Doubtful.

The one thing that is true of two people who are looking for work; one of which has a mental health issue and the other who does not, is that both are coping to control what they can, but with different degrees of success based on what we can observe. So while both may get the email indicating they’ve been rejected in favour of someone else, the one can within a day bounce back and re-focus. The other may appear to wallow in sadness, miss appointments for job search help, even perhaps look to have given in and given up altogether.

It is you see something they have lost the ability to cope with for a period of time the way they once might have done. What was once abnormal has become their new normal. If you are close to this person, you might be profoundly affected by their change. Monitoring the change in someone’s mental health isn’t like keeping an eye on that rash. Where we are qualified to put on some ointment, bathe and cleanse a rash, we are not qualified or even know where to begin to help someone deal with their adversely changing mental health.

And in dealing with person who has a mental health challenge, it might be easier for us to ask them to just snap out of it, tough it out, deal with it, get over it – get back in other words to being the person they were before when we were comfortable with them and knew how to help them. It’s how we deal with our own fears in wanting to help and not knowing how.

A little empathy, kindness, patience and understanding is what is needed. Get a medical check up if you’re out of work and pay attention to changes you might be experiencing. Living with someone you suspect is experiencing some mental health changes? See your own doctor and get helpful suggestions and community referrals.

What Would You Give To Be Normal?


Normal; what’s that? I suppose it might depend on who you asked that question to and what had gone on in that person’s life up until the point you asked them the question. But what I do believe is that whatever a person has been usually experiencing in their life is the norm for them personally, so to want to change and be normal indicates a desire to change what one usually experiences.

When I’m sitting down one on one with some of my clients who tell me they just want to be normal, I usually ask them what they mean by that, or what ‘normal’ would look like on a daily basis for them. Most of the time, they describe waking up feeling rested, having a job to go to, having some extra money each month to buy things and having a good relationship with someone. Not always you understand, and there are variations, but this is ‘normal’ described by most.

Unfortunately, many describe to me years of feeling unappreciated, put down and told over and over again that they won’t amount to much, being a product of a broken home where parents separated, divorced or one just walked away, knowing early on that they were different from other kids. That feeling of being different and somehow not measuring up even as a child somehow seems to have set a pattern in motion where as a young adult, they feel anxiety, know the life they are living isn’t the life they want, and yet for all their trying it just isn’t getting much better.

One of the key things to recognize here is that even when speaking with someone who has the desire for change, the major hurdle to overcome the present and change the future largely depends on two critical skills; the ability to map out a plan and secondly the ability to put that plan into action.

As an Employment Counsellor, I often sit down with people and after discussing their wants, interests, skills and abilities, I will summarize what they’ve been saying and create a step-by-step plan for them which if followed will allow them to reach their goals. To have any chance of success however, this plan has to be their plan, not my plan for them – and there is a huge difference in the two. But in either case, they will nod their head and look very interested so make sure you make it clear this is their plan!

Now the implementation of this plan is the biggest challenge and where things invariably go wrong if go wrong it does. Why is it many seem destined to fail implementing the plan? It’s not for lack of wanting it to succeed but more a case of not having the skills (though no fault of their own) to make it happen.

Take school for an example. Suppose someone wants to head off to College or University and take a course to eventually become a Speech Pathologist. Where to start? Instead of thinking, “what’s my first step?”, work the thing out backwards. Imagine yourself in the job first. Okay so what happened just before you became a Speech Pathologist? You graduated. Great. And before that? You spent 2 – 4 years in school (research will tell you how many). How did you get into school? You enrolled. How did you enrol? You registered and got a student loan. How did you register? You went to the school, met a Guidance Counsellor, got all the required information including deadlines for admissions and applied online. And the funding? You filled out an application for assistance. And before this? You researched program requirements, schools that offered the program and made a decision. And before that? You chose a career. Whew!

If you are a visual person, you could draw up the above plan and stick it on the fridge with check boxes for each step in various colours to grab your attention and mark your progress. If you are a writer, you might prefer to have this plan mapped out in a journal recording your steps along the way and document your feelings as you go.

So is this what normal people do to succeed? And to be ‘normal’ is it what you’d need to do? Maybe. It all depends on how you define normal and what’s right for you personally. It could also be that you just want to sleep uninterrupted, wake up feeling rested and not have bad thoughts assault your brain in the first four seconds. Motivating yourself to get up and get out alone could be two major steps on some days, forgetting all about College or University which might not be right for you.

Some people need smaller steps, a series of small successes which build upon each other and create a new pattern of behaviour. Trying to overcome 20 or 30 years of whatever it is you want to change won’t happen overnight. Give yourself permission to fail and have setbacks. It’s not you who’s failing, it’s the steps that didn’t work out but may work out in the future if you give yourself a chance and make the effort to try again.

Being normal? Normal is experiencing some setbacks but wanting something enough that we work through the setbacks and try again. And hey, you’re worth it; seriously, you’re worth it.