How Many Jobs Should You Apply To Per Day?


The short answer is a nice big fuzzy, “it depends.”

Now of course the logical question you’re framing in your mind is what does it depend on? Am I correct? While setting goals for yourself is commendable and strongly encouraged, it’s not always the best strategy to set a number of jobs to apply to each day when you’re out of work. That may come as a surprise to some of my readers given that I’m an Employment Counsellor.

An effective job search is about more than just filling out applications and firing off resumes to organizations online or via email. In fact, a healthy job search allocates time to a number of activities which will keep you busy and productive.

Now while you may be driven to actually apply for employment, it’s not always the case that the person who applies for the most number of jobs is ultimately the first one hired. Nor is it the case that the one who applies for the most number of jobs is the one who lands in the right job; and that can lead to many job changes when the positions don’t last long.

Sure you should look for jobs daily. By all means set aside some time in the morning to see what new postings may have come out in the last 24 hours. You don’t want to miss an opportunity that you’ve otherwise kept your eye on and find it has some extremely short deadline to apply and then miss it. How unfortunate that would be! If you also look into postings once during the afternoon, you’re already doing a good job of staying on top of what’s available.

There are other things you should be paying attention to however; and it’s these other things that will keep you productively engaged in your job search and give you enough variety so you avoid discouragement. Here’s a list:

  1. References. Now is the best time to put together a list of the people you know who will vouch for your work performance. Current or former employers, supervisors and/or co-workers are excellent choices. You’ll need a minimum of 3 of these, including the correct spelling of their names, titles, company names, phone numbers and emails. By the way, send them a current resume to have on hand as well as a note of appreciation for their ongoing support.
  2. Social Media Profile. When applying for a position, many employers will turn to the internet and dig around to find what they can about you. If you started a LinkedIn profile but never really developed it much, now is a great time to devote some attention to developing and fleshing out your profile. Put in a little effort now and you won’t feel embarrassed about your profile later.
  3. Exercise. Job searching is stressful for almost everybody and it manifests itself in physical ways. Getting out for a walk, bicycle ride, the elliptical gathering cobwebs in the basement or a trip to the gym will not only improve your physical fitness but ward off aches and pains.
  4. Enjoy A Pastime. If you need permission to spend some time doing things you enjoy, here it is. Get out in the garden, work those knitting needles, pound those keyboards, pick up that paintbrush. Setting aside some time to do things which bring you happiness and keep up your sense of normal day-to-day living is strongly encouraged. Job searching need not be all-consuming.
  5. Practice Interviewing. I know, I know, I know. This is likely something you don’t enjoy and only want to do when absolutely necessary. Still, without practice and more practice, you’re not going to be at your best just winging it on the day of the big interview. You’ll feel mounting anxiety if you put off practicing and end up sitting in some Reception area wishing you had dusted off your interview skills earlier.
  6. Work Your Network. Networking is essential; engaging with other people, taping into their resources, gaining support and advice, drawing on their expertise and experience. Be it phone calls, face-to-face, over the net, etc., devote some time to reaching out. All those friends on FB and connections on LI you’ve been building are a good place to start.
  7. Diet. By diet I do not mean lose weight. What I do mean is pay attention to both the quantity of food you consume and the quality. When you’re off work, the proximity to your pantry and fridge is considerably reduced, and your trips to both may be much more frequent. If you don’t bring junk into the house in the first place it won’t be there for you to over-indulge in during those weak moments when you crave comfort food.

There’s more you could be doing for sure, but these 7 are a good start. Setting yourself an arbitrary goal of say, 8 job applications a day will either set you up to fail or have you applying at jobs you don’t really want at all just to meet this quota.

If you’re only applying to a single job every week or less you’ve got to step things up my friend. What I’m saying is balance is the key; apply for jobs that you’re truly qualified to do and motivated to do – absolutely. It’s equally important however to get out from in front of a monitor and keep living.

 

Looking For Work Means You’re Working


Are you the kind of person who has had to work hard for every job you’ve had in the past? Have you had the good fortune to perhaps on the other hand had jobs land in your lap; a friend of your dad’s, a connection of your mother’s or some other family member knew someone who hired you and all you had to do was agree to take the job?

Well having a job handed to you might have been seen as good fortune at one point but, if it led you to think that finding a job isn’t so tough, what might have been kindness on someone’s part actually did you a disservice. Looking for a job like anything else in life takes skill, tenacity, knowledge, determination and resilience.

A lot has changed in how to look for employment over just a few short years; the emergence of online applications as not just one way to apply for a job but in more situations the only way to apply for a job. Applicant Tracking Software is thinning out applicants long before human eyeballs ever look over individual resumes; a process many job seekers have no idea even exists.

However, there are some aspects of looking for work that are essentially the same; before you can convince an employer you’re right for the job, you have to know why yourself. You’re going to need to understand how your skills, experience and personality are the right combination the employer requires, and you can’t rely on just your good looks and ability to wing it in interviews anymore. If you plan on winging it in today’s interviews, be prepared to be exposed in the interview as having put little effort into your preparation and be sent packing. Too bad too, because if you sincerely want to work for a particular company, you may never be offered that second chance to impress.

Looking for work is work. I have to admit that as an Employment Counsellor I am surprised by the number of people out there who still think making a generic resume and photocopying it 20 or 30 times and doing a mass handout is how to find work. Does this work anymore? Sure, in entry-level jobs with an employer who may be in a desperate situation and in you come and you’ll do for the short-term until they can find the right candidate. You might even stay right up until a few days before your probation is up only to be let go and replaced by someone who is better qualified when the employer goes through their proper hiring practices.

The thing is most people – and I mean a large number of people – don’t practice their job searching skills when they aren’t looking for work. Then when they start looking for work, they trust to their own abilities based on their past experiences, make a minor change or two on their resume and figure that’s it. Those same people are then frustrated that looking for a job takes longer than they remembered and eventually when they do seek out help, they are surprised how  much has changed from the way they recall looking for work in the past.

All things evolve and job searching is no different. Just yesterday I was looking at a job with someone who was interested in working for a large retail chain. After reading the job posting, we put together a resume specifically targeting all the key requirements the employer was looking for. Sounds like all we need to do now is get it in the hands of the employer right? Send it off electronically by clicking on that ‘apply’ button on their webpage right? Wrong!

No, in addition to crafting this resume, there was then a 9 step process to complete. There were questions to answer which would determine personal suitability and knowledge of the job. They wanted references right then and there plus what amounted to breaking down the contents of the resume and asked for the reasons behind moving from one job to another in the applicants past. There was a lot of other information they requested as well, and it looked like about a solid hours worth of work to even get through the application process.

So now in addition to being able to work in retail, any applicant applying for this company needs computer skills , access to the internet and a lot of patience. Get yourself all glammed up and walk in the door expecting your looks and winning smile to get you the job and you won’t even make it to the Hiring Manager’s office. You’ll be sent packing with your resume still in your possession because they won’t even take it anymore in person. “First step is apply online.”

Frankly, entry-level jobs are generally easier to obtain than middle or upper level positions. That much hasn’t changed over time. However, what has changed is the process of applying for entry-level jobs; the process is mirroring the same process those higher level jobs require. If you don’t move with the times you will be left behind; unemployed and out of work until you realize that finding work is a job in and of itself.

No computer skills? Take a basic computer class. Out of date resume? Update it now, especially if you are working. Hope you’re ready to invest in finding a job; it pays off only after you put in the effort.

 

Get That Job Search Going


Are you one of those people who, being unemployed decided nonetheless to give yourself a vacation? You know, you promised yourself that after August was over, you’d get serious again about looking for a job? Well, if this is you, I implore you to start now and not wait until September officially arrives because if you wait until the end of August, you’ll likely miss opportunities that others will have seized.

Now many people I’m sure are puzzled at the idea of unemployed people taking a vacation in the first place. Re-allocating time from job searching to not searching perhaps, but ‘vacation’ somehow seems to be the wrong word. Yes to many, a vacation means a break from paid employment where the employee is still getting paid from the employer. Hence in this definition, the unemployed person giving themselves a vacation doesn’t fit.

Of course, the unemployed person might state that they are indeed getting paid; either through employment insurance or being in receipt of some kind of social assistance benefits. They may inadvertently offend the wrong person by laughing about being in receipt of government benefits and taking a vacation; making the mistake of essentially telling the wrong person who sees themselves as paying in part for this persons vacation as a taxpayer. Well let’s leave that whole discussion for another time as it alone could fill several blogs.

Let’s get back to getting going again on that job search. Mid-August to mid-September is here in Canada the 2nd best time to get hired, second only to the March to April months. If you look at sheer numbers, you’ll see there are a lot of employers who take on new employees during these periods. So based on the hiring trends of employers – at least here in North America, you’d best get going now.

A second reason to get going now is that you are likely similar to most people who move from one state of mind to another gradually. The state of mind of someone who has essentially given themselves a break from job searching for a month or two isn’t likely to kick into high gear without some sputtering and false starts. What I’m saying is that if you last looked seriously for work in June, you’re not likely to go from zero job searching over the summer to a full-time, 7 hour daily job search in a day. No, you’ll likely fall to the temptation of just another day at a beach, another ice cream cone with some friends or another day of sleeping later than you know you should if you’re committed to a job search.

Given the above, you might find that by starting now on your job search, you’ll be far more likely to hit September at full speed than you will if you fully ignore the job search until August 31. Just as a teacher can tell on the first day of class the child who has done some reading or review over the summer from the child who hasn’t, Employment Counsellors and employers can tell who has been focused on job searching and who hasn’t when they meet them. Unlike children however who are in class from September to June the following year, you as a job seeker are only looking for work as long as it takes to get a job offer.  

There’s a lot to job searching; if you’re being honest and upfront. There’s cover letter writing, scanning job boards, doing research on potential jobs, employers, employees and hiring trends. There’s resumes to craft, references to find and keep updated, thank you notes to pen, computer skills to upgrade, job search logs to update every day, rejection letters to send, phone calls to make; including cold calls. There’s the fall wardrobe to think about and possibly add to. After a summer of not job searching and indulging in guilt-free meals and ice cream cones, there are the existing clothes in the closet to go through and find what no longer fits and needs replacing.

More important than any one or in fact all the items in the previous paragraph, there is the state of mind – what you’re thinking between the ears – that needs some attention. You can’t just switch on and off the necessary toughness and commitment to job search like you can a light switch. Job searching is tough; if it was easy, you’d be employed by now after all and wouldn’t have quit over the vacation period in the first place. If you don’t think finding a job is hard, I suspect you haven’t really looked for one in a while. Well either this or you aren’t looking for a challenging job that matches your skills and interests.

Look, there are a lot of people just like you who aren’t looking for work full-time. Some have removed themselves from looking out of frustration; others may have just taken the summer off. Get going now and you can get a small but important advantage over these people. The longer you put off looking for work, the more you help your competition who’d love nothing better than you just continue to spend your days at beaches or in front of computer gaming screens; such activities only help their chances at getting job offers that would interest you.

You’re choice of course, but the smart folks are already looking.

Job Searching And Company Reserach


The curious thing about researching a potential employer is how poorly most of us do it. I’ve been as guilty of this in the past as I suspect you may have been yourself; but in today’s job market, it’s downright critical.

When it comes to applying for work with a company, there is a wide spectrum of methods people employ to find out what an employer is all about. Many people do absolutely no research whatsoever. I have witnessed these people go up to a job board, take a job down and dash off an email attaching their resume; replace the job posting back on the board and continue to scour the board looking for another job to repeat the process.

Such people do no research on the employer; they don’t even keep track of the jobs or the employers to which they’ve applied. I overheard the phone calls they occasionally get from some employers where the job seeker at some point has to ask the person at the other end what company they represent and what the job is they are referencing. Having to ask this of the person on the phone sure doesn’t establish a great impression.

I’ve noticed in some recent job postings that companies are including a short snapshot of themselves; perhaps a paragraph or two, and they include a hyperlink to their website where the job seeker can learn more. If an organization goes so far as to include this, “learn more about us” feature, applicants would be wise to start their research with a click of the mouse.

How you look at researching an employer says a lot about whether or not you see any value in it and the extent to which you attach value will determine how much or how little research you actually do. While some do no research at all, others do plan to do a little bit of research, but only after a company actually grants them an interview. After all they reason, why put a lot of precious energy into researching a company who may not even call me in? And so they justify not doing much if any research at the application stage. What happens though if the employer calls and there’s a micro-interview right on the phone? No time to do research at that point. A phone interview is under way; the result of which will determine if a face-to-face interview is granted.

Look, have you ever taken a job and after only a few days you realize something isn’t to your liking? All the excitement of having a new job is replaced with “what have I got myself into?” You usually end up either quitting or getting dismissed because the fit is a bad one; even though you have the skills and qualifications to do the work itself. You can avoid this waste of their time and yours by doing some research into the company. Why I’ve even seen people accept an interview and then not bother to show up for the interview at all because – surprise, surprise, the company is located too far away from where they live and they refuse to do a long commute. “I had no idea they were at the other end of the city!” and I’m just thinking, “Really? You didn’t know?”

So here are some things you should look into for every job you apply to:

  1. Where it’s located?
  2. How you’d get there?
  3. The hours of work
  4. Salary range
  5. What you’d actually do
  6. Product(s) or service(s) produced
  7. Who products and services are made for
  8. Company name and reputation

Now I’ve kept this list short so that those of you who frown at the idea of any research as a lot of effort don’t feel overwhelmed.  The 8 items above are usually easy to find out, and you can if you want make up a chart on paper or using MS Excel to capture this information for each job you apply to. This makes it easy to just add the information to pre-set columns instead of trying to remember each time what you should be finding out.

Knowing where you’d actually be expected to work could help you out big time. While the interview might be at the head office across the city, maybe the job itself is only a 10 minute walk from your front door. Looking into how you’d get to work might be impacted by your hours of work. Public transit doesn’t run 24/7 so if you rely on it, will you be able to get to and from work if the job is shift work? Oh and salary? You don’t want to take a job and learn you can’t live off the wages they pay.

Finding out what you’d actually do, instead presuming what you’d do could save you from feeling deceived or misled. Knowing the end-product or services, who their designed for and the company’s reputation is important so that you know what you’re getting into and with whom. If the company doesn’t pay employees on time or turnovers are frequent, you’ll appreciate knowing this so you can determine how much you’ll risk working for them.

If you don’t know how to go about doing research, ask the people who work where you find these job boards. They’ll either know or direct you to people who do.

Gambling At The Job Board


There are many people who go about job searching by standing in front of a job board and scanning the wall for employment. There are far more people pulling up job search websites on the computer and essentially doing the same thing; scrolling through screen after screen of various jobs. I find this perplexing and a huge waste of time, but surprisingly this is exactly the behaviour many people exhibit when they look for work. Stop doing this! It’s not a good way to find the right job!

When you stop and think about it, it’s like gambling or visiting a fortune teller isn’t it? In the few seconds immediately before you hit the job board, you had no idea what job you would find. After standing at a job board for 30 seconds or so, you really believe you’re suddenly going to have your eyes drawn to your dream job; that one job that is not only something you can do but will be with the perfect employer, paying a fair wage you’ll be comfortable with, and you’ll work in an atmosphere that matches your needs – all within a reasonable commute? Yeah, good luck with that one. It just doesn’t happen like this.

What really happens is people find jobs they could tolerate, and with no research into the company, the culture or the working conditions, they apply. Even if they get interviewed and get the job, it seldom lasts long; the reason being that once employed, the person says, “Okay I’ve gone from no job to a job that’s a poor fit for me personally, so now I start looking for a better job.” The other result I see time and time again is that the person is fired because they don’t perform well, or the person quits the second they feel they are being manipulated and asked to do things they didn’t expect. Then what do they do? They repeat the entire process and stand again in front of a job board having learned nothing. Sigh….

Don’t start your job search scanning a job board. That’s as blunt as I can make it.

One of your first steps in finding meaningful work that you’ll actually enjoy doing and which you’ll do well is to evaluate your skills, education and work preferences. It’s like taking an inventory of you. Don’t scoff and say, “I don’t need to waste time doing this – nobody knows me better than me.” Without even knowing you personally, I will suggest you actually don’t know yourself as much as you claim; you should of course, but I suspect you don’t. For example, what’s your problem-solving style? What are your key work values? What style of leadership do you best function under? Give me your three top transferable skills.

So, did the answers just roll off your tongue or did you just read the questions above without really stopping to think and answer them intelligently? Is this a defensive mechanism of yours you use when you get asked questions you don’t know the answers to but don’t want to admit you don’t?

Look, if you’re used to randomly picking a job off a website or job board and sending them your standard generic resume, let me ask you how successful this has been for you in the past in getting a job that you were good at, paid you well for your time, and which you stayed at for longer than a couple of years? If it’s working for you, then by all means you’re right to continue with this strategy. On the other hand, if this method isn’t working for you, if you’re frustrated just randomly hoping the clouds will part and a sunbeam will illuminate your dream job while the sound of angels reach your ears, do something different. If you keep doing the same thing, the results you get will likewise be the same.

Write down your skills. What are the things you enjoy doing? Write them down. On a map, draw a circle of the area you are willing to work in. Would you move to take a job? If so, how attractive would the job have to be to get you to pick up and relocate? What’s your education level? Would you consider going back to school to upgrade your education if it meant you’d be better qualified to compete for jobs you really want? What would your ideal supervisor be like; hands-on or hands-off? What’s the perfect environment for you; surrounded by creative types, techies, labourers or number crunchers?

These are just some of the many questions you could and should ask yourself long before you actually start looking at jobs on a board or website. If you don’t really know who you are; your strengths, weaknesses, interests and passions, you’re going to find yourself in the wrong jobs more often than not. You really are gambling; playing hit and miss and wasting much of your life in the process, making it all the harder to find the right job by taking the time to assess yourself first.

If you’re young, do a variety of things and find out what you like and don’t like; what you’re good at and what you need to work on. No experience is wasted if you learn from it. If you’re older, take stock of what you’ve done.

Need help? Ask for it.

Hired: A Renewed Appreciation For Work


It’s not as easy for many people to get a job these days as it was in the past.

Headlines are full of company closures, layoffs,  line reductions, shifts being eliminated or company relocations. Despite all these stories however, there are always a number of people who quit anyway expecting to buck the trend and find their next job in short order.

It’s not hard to imagine why some people in job-hungry times still gamble with their financial independence and quit their jobs. Essentially, those who do think back to their personal history and make a decision to go job searching based on how they experienced the hunt for new employment in the past. They believe if they didn’t take too long to secure a new job in the past, it is unlikely they’ll have much of a problem getting one now in the present.

When the economic climate changes however, companies find it necessary to cut back on their workforce, take measures to reduce their expenditures and hold off on previously planned expansion initiatives. Were we talking of a single company or two in this situation, not much impact would be felt. Yet when you consider this is the story for many, the impact on job seekers as a whole makes finding work harder. The reality of the times has changed from what the job seeker previously experienced.

All of a sudden the individual who quit their job finds it  harder to find new job leads and get hired than in the past. Their unemployment stretches out longer, the pressure to find income rises and the prolonged unemployment is a new experience. Many don’t know how to respond effectively; be it budgeting or how technology has impacted the way job searching is done.

Often during an extended search for new employment, a job seeker will think back on the job they quit with some regret. In retrospect, they often feel that if they could do it again, they would have held on to that job while they looked for a new one instead of just quitting outright. At the time however, they never thought for a second that their inability to find their next job would take so long.

This change in attitude has one clear benefit; the appreciation for the next job if and when it does come around. This new-found appreciation in some makes them a better employee to work with, perhaps a little less confrontational, a bit more team-oriented and more inclined to act in  ways that will keep them employed – i.e.. their production levels rise.

Don’t think that I’m describing everyone in that previous paragraph. No there are many who don’t really change much once they are employed again. These folks will revert back as soon as they are hired, or just after their probation to the person they have always been; thinking and acting pretty much the same. The impact of their unemployment seems to make them bitter, jaded and hardened instead of appreciative. Now they  look out for number one – themselves; an employer drops to a distant number two.

I interact on a daily basis with a large population of the unemployed. Generally speaking, older job seekers are looking for that one break – that once last chance to demonstrate how appreciative they’ll be and how hard they’ll work. They see the window of opportunity closing quickly because they have a finite number of years to work left, and with a prolonged job search, that window is getting smaller.

Younger unemployed people on the other hand don’t feel the finite period of employment to the same degree. They may be in their 30’s and have another 30 years to go and believe they’ll have 4 or 5 more jobs so the pressure is felt less when talking of the sheer number of years remaining to work.

If you have ever been out of work for longer than you would have liked, you can probably mentally and emotionally re-visit that unemployed period relatively easily if you allow yourself to remember what it felt like. Many don’t want to recall those feelings for obvious reasons; it was a period of low self-esteem, struggle and increased frustration. Recalling the emotional and financial turmoil can however remind us of how appreciative we should be for the work we do now, and for the income and sense of purpose we have. This recall can also help us feel increased empathy for others who are experiencing now what we felt in the past.

Ask yourself however if you have slid somewhat back into a sense of entitlement; have you’ve abandoned that sense of appreciation for the job you have now in some respects because you’ve managed to hold on to this job for a period of time? Would  you go about your work with more enthusiasm, productively and appreciation than you currently do were you just recently hired? If the answer you give yourself is, ‘yes’, maybe you might consider working in such a way that you keep that previously held sense of appreciation front and center in your mind.

Appreciating our jobs comes when we realize it isn’t just the job we are appreciating but how we feel overall. Work provides income, stability, purpose, a daily routine, security and keeps us engaged with others among other benefits. Work combats isolation, desperation, low self-worth, dependency, stress and loss of purpose.

You may not love your job, but appreciate its benefits.

Unemployed And Running Into Old Friends


When out of work, there is a tendency among many people to go into isolation. This behaviour is understandable because the hope is that a job will be found relatively soon, and an announcement can be made about a change in jobs, by-passing the entire, “I’m out of work at the moment” discussion.

It’s actually counter-productive to withhold one’s unemployed status however, for the very reason that your network of friends may be able to source out your next employment opportunity. If they don’t know you are looking for work however, you don’t come to mind if and when the boss says, “We’re hiring. Know anyone?”

But what I really want to focus on for this blog is the inevitable chance meeting that occurs when an old friend and you connect by chance and the conversation turns to where you are working. It’s usually not one of those great moments, and I’d go so far as to say it’s likely to be a source of anxiety and maybe even shame and embarrassment. Maybe it’s an old high school friend and you had big ambitions back then, so this chance meeting and the question of what you are doing now is some kind of measuring stick. “So what have you been up to?”, translates into, “You had big dreams Jimmy boy, are you a success or a failure?”

Now you may never run into that person for another 40 years, or they may have moved back into the neighbourhood and you’ll see them weekly. So without knowing for sure, it may not be the best advice to make up some lie just to save face. On the other hand, pride is real and it can’t be denied that we all want to look and sound successful and our lack of employment for many is a raw open wound they’d rather not expose for view and commentary. What’s beyond our control as well is the news possibly spreading about our unemployment when one friend tells another etc.

Remember that the work we do and the companies we work for are not the sum of what defines us. You can be entirely out of work and a success by many other standards. You could for example have a wonderful marriage, great kids, a comfortable home or your car is paid off. Perhaps you are a needed volunteer in the community in which you live, counted on and appreciated by those for whom you volunteer. You could have a number of skills around the house such as renovation, decorating, housecleaning, budgeting or landscaping skills. And while you may not want to put these skills to use in your next job search, it is these skills and others that you can cite as parts of your life where you are doing quite well indeed.

And maybe you’re one of those people who others come to when they’ve got problems and challenges. Your sympathetic and non-judgemental ear is always there for your closest friends and family. Your advice is sought out and it’s amazing how better people feel after talking with you about their issues. If this is the case, how wise those people are for sharing their problems with you. So in turn by the way, if they are so wise for doing so, why aren’t you sharing your unemployment and the problems it’s raising for you with them? Follow your own advice and share rather than conceal your real feelings. After all, you are human and entitled to a bit of counselling advice yourself.

Have you ever heard of someone throwing themselves an unemployment party? I have. It’s where all your friends, family, old co-workers, and acquaintances receive an invitation to a party you throw yourself. Not a sombre affair, it’s merry, complete with good food and beverages, and everyone gets a goody bag at the party including your up to date resume, portfolio, contact information and an idea of exactly the kind of work you are looking for. Instead of running all over and networking with these people at 14 different locations requiring transportation on your part and various time commitments, you do it with all of them at one location: your house.

Ah but it’s when you’re sitting down at the local coffee shop alone having a quiet moment that you might get taken by surprise hearing someone say, “Julia? It is you! It’s me, Gloria…gosh it’s been ages, can I join you?” And so instead of sitting down quietly alone and reassembling your mental armour, you find yourself exposed and vulnerable talking when clearly you weren’t ready for this. Suddenly you wonder about your hair, your makeup, the clothes you chose to wear, and either feel reassured or apologetic. And why? Because the dreaded question of employment as stated earlier comes up within the first two minutes. Bet on it.

And we want a good answer to that question to show them (and ourselves) that against this person we measure up well. That’s natural and normal. You are more than defined by your job however. Never miss the chance to be honest and market yourself. After all, you never know who may provide the job lead you need to get that next job. If it’s true that it’s who you know, not what you know, you’ve got to make sure they know. So even if you don’t have your resume with you, get their number or address and send them a package!