Want A Better Life?


Last night while talking with my wife, she shared a comment that someone she knows often makes. The fellow said, “I’ve had a lot happen in my life.” This, apparently is what he says as a way of both explaining why his life isn’t that good and why it won’t get better either. Like people all over the world, this fellow has had his share of challenges, but it’s like he wears his as a badge of honour not choosing to actually make some changes and do things in the here and now that will alter his future for the better.

It struck me then as it does now, that it might be useful to talk about how to go about improving the future; your future. After all, it’s a safe bet you’d like yours to get better whether your past and present have been a series of disasters or quite good. There are some, many I suppose who actually like chaos and disappointment but let’s look to focus on making life a better one in the future for you.

So here’s some ideas to get you started. Share these with anyone you feel might benefit from reading them with my thanks.

  1. Change has to happen. If you want a different future than your past or present change must occur so see making changes as a good thing. This will take some getting use to and it may be uncomfortable at times when you do things differently. However, expecting a better future when you keep doing what you’ve always done hasn’t worked before and it won’t work now. Welcome changes.
  2. Make better decisions. Those changes I spoke of in point 1 can only happen if you make different decisions than you’ve typically made. The key is not only to make different decisions but better decisions. Again, these better decisions won’t always be easy or comfortable but you want a better life right?
  3. Take responsibility. This is your life, and it’s made up of your decisions in the past, the present and the future. Stop blaming your parents, family and friends, former bosses and co-workers for what life has ‘done’ to you. Stop giving them power over you and admit this is your life to live and yours to make. That’s empowering and with that power comes responsibility and accountability.
  4. Get help. If you had the necessary skills to make better decisions, it’s highly likely that you would have done so right? Yet, here you are wanting things better than they are which indicates you need some guidance and advice when it comes to both making those choices and support on the follow through.
  5. Move on. The thing about the past is that it is…well…the past. You can’t go back there, you can’t live there. Move on. Try walking forward down a sidewalk with your head facing backwards and you’ll run into a lot of obstacles. Turn your eyes forward and you can avoid those collisions. Look forward in life and move on.
  6. Learn and not re-live. Making the same mistakes over and over and re-living the errors of your ways isn’t productive. When things go wrong – and they will – learn what you can from the experience with the goal of making better decisions in the future when you find yourself in similar situations.
  7. Eliminate temptations. You might have good intentions but fall to temptations if you don’t remove yourself from what’s caused you problems up to now. So it could mean dropping friends who are bad influences, moving from a bad neighbourhood, clearing the house of the alcohol or the chocolate and fatty foods. You have to want your end goal more than your temporary fix.
  8. Set Goals. Know what you want in this better future you imagine. Picture that job, the ideal partner, a better apartment or condo, a clear complexion, a new set of teeth, no criminal record. Whatever it is, set a goal; maybe several that are meaningful to you personally.
  9. Develop plans. Goals don’t turn into reality without some planning. Again, get some help from someone you trust. Start with one of your long-term goals and come up with a plan that will eventually cut the things getting in your way of having this better future. Big problems will take time and a lot of effort. Small problems are easier addressed. Both big and small need attention.
  10. Commit to yourself. You’re going to have setbacks, make some spur of the moment decisions you regret but don’t pack in the, “I want a better future”, plan. When you have a setback, re-commit to yourself what you’re working towards and focus on what you’ve accomplished so far.
  11. Forgive. A big one. Don’t carry hate, anger and bitterness around with you because it’s not attractive, certainly doesn’t help you and always hinders you. Let it go and forgive those who harmed you, set you back, let you down and disappointed you. This is your life not theirs; you’re forgiving them because YOU’VE moved on.

Look it’s not going to be easy and few things in life that are worth having are. In fact, ‘easy’ hasn’t been your past life has it? Nor your current life? So, ‘easy’ has nothing to do with it. Yep, you’re going to have to work for what you want and all that’s going to do is make you proud of yourself when you get it. It’s your call.

Problem? Show Your Skills. Solve It


One of the most common skills you’ll find on many job postings is the requirement to solve problems. As an Employment Counsellor, I notice the relative ease with which many people happily add the ability to solve problems to their resumes. Ah, but when faced with problems that I observe, they are sorely lacking in this area.

It would seem that many people don’t think about their problem solving skills outside of the workplaces they are trying to get employed with. It’s as if they are saying, “I have to get a job before I can show you my problem solving skills.” Really? Uh, no that’s not true.

We all have problems; some are small, some large and some are truly huge which we have to work on over a long period of time. All problems however have certain characteristics in common and the process for eliminating them is similar.

Problems by their nature threaten our goals. When we identify what we want to achieve, we then determine if things stand in our way be they small, medium or large and then we have to evaluate whether those things, (let’s call them barriers or challenges) are worth the effort to overcome or not. If we determine our end goals are important enough, we set out to tackle the barriers. If the barriers themselves are too massive to overcome and we aren’t willing to put in the effort to move past them, the goals we want aren’t important enough to us and we might as well stop ‘wanting’ the end goal. We’re setting ourselves up for failure; well at least until achieving the end goal takes on greater importance to us than the work it will take to eliminate the barriers standing in our way.

Simply put, make sure your goals are bigger than your biggest problems.

Suppose you’ve looked at what you want to do career-wise, and you’ve determined that a return to school is absolutely critical in order to get the academic qualifications necessary to compete for that dream job. You’re looking at 2-3 years of College or University. This means you’re also going to have to take on 2-3 years of debt and you’ll be 3-4 years older when you graduate and ready to compete with others for your end goal. Depending on a number of factors such as your age, how much you really want that career and your perception of debt vs. an investment in yourself, you either have to pass up the end goal because going to school is standing in your way or you enrol and invest money and time in yourself.

Or perhaps you find the job you really want is in another neighbouring city and it’s going to take you 1.5 hours to get there and another 1.5 hours to return each day by transit. You know you COULD move closer, but you’ve got your child in school and at 8 years old they’d have to change schools and you’ve got family just down the street for emotional support. One person will choose to stay put choosing unemployment for the present and the status quo while another will choose to pick up and relocate, rationalizing that the child is only 8 and kids make new friends in no time; what’s the big deal?

The thing about problems or challenges is that they always come with choices. The good problem solvers know that the first step to solving problems is to see them for what they actually are not what they imagine them to be. They weigh the importance of their end goals against the problems standing in their way and then brainstorm the various options they have to eliminate the problems. One thing they also do is ask other people for input; after all, other people might present options they themselves haven’t considered.

Smaller scale problems that crop up are solved the same way. You wake up and there are salt stains on your favourite pair of pants; pants you were planning on wearing. One person might just toss them in the laundry and pull out a second pair while another person might let that small problem paralyze them entirely; throwing off their mood, upsetting their plans and they just don’t go to work or that big interview because they have, ‘nothing to wear’.  (It’s true actually; I’ve heard this one many times.)

When you tackle a small problem and succeed, two things happen. First of all the immediate problem is overcome and you’re closer to achieving your goal. Secondly you build some confidence in your ability to solve problems, and that confidence gives you the courage to tackle other problems. Start to solve a few problems and you feel you can apply the same thought process and actions to tackle even bigger issues, and soon you’ve got a track record of solving your issues. Now you can truly say you are good at solving problems AND you’ll have examples to cite when asked in an interview as proof rather than a baseless claim.

So when faced with a problem, stack it up against your end goal. See the problem for what it actually is. Brainstorm your options. Get ideas from others. Take action if the end goal is important enough to you and if it isn’t, ditch the goal you’ve got in mind. Remember, if your problems are bigger than your goals, nothing happens unless you change the value of the end goal.

 

A Workshop Facilitation Problem


Today I have a choice to make, and it’s one I’ve been contemplating and confounded by all of last evening; I still don’t know what I’ll decide. This is the kind of dilemma every Workshop Facilitator has the possibility of being confronted with and those in the workshops themselves will never have to face, but will certainly be impacted by.

I’m starting in the middle, so let me back up to yesterday morning right about this time. Here in Ontario we got snow which caused delays in people getting to their destinations. I myself arrived 15 minutes later to work than I normally do, but as I always allow 30 minutes leeway, I was still 15 minutes ahead of my 8:00 a.m. official start. So the usual 1 hour drive took 1 hour and 15 minutes. All the way i, I had one prevailing thought; “How many people will show up for Day 1 of the workshop?”

The workshop I’m running is a 10 day intensive job search for 12 unemployed people on social assistance. In order to attend, they can’t refer themselves; either I or one of my colleagues must refer them to me, and I go over ahead of the program what they are in store for. Gauging their interest and commitment, I then select 12 who in short, need to want a job more than I want it for them.

Well of course there was a problem with attendance or I’d be sharing something else. 5 showed up by the 9:00 a.m. start time; 1 called to say he was running late and would be there shortly and arrived 20 minutes in. Of the six remaining, 1 called in with the flu, 1 had a flat tire on the way, 3 emailed to say they had job interviews in Toronto and would gone for the entire day, and 1 didn’t call in at all. When I reached the last fellow, he claimed the weather kept him from coming and he “was going to call” but never did.

So here’s the situation in which I find myself. Literally 6 of the 12 weren’t there for the first day; a day in which I had those present introduce themselves and me to them. We covered expectations and I handed out resources both electronic and manual. We went over resumes as a group and had a quick visual look at the ones of those in attendance so they could contrast theirs with the format I’d like to see them use.

Under normal conditions, I’d move ahead to day with a short ½ hour talk on some job search subject and then release them all to job search. However, if Day 1 takes from 9:00 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. to set everyone up for the two weeks and get them mentally prepared, I’ve got 6 who should similarly need that same time today. However, I’ve got 6 who did show up and expect to move ahead and throw themselves into job searching; each meeting with me individually for guidance and help starting this morning while the others job search.

Now if I was missing one or two on the first day, I’d have them briefly introduce themselves and the group to them, and I’d get them up to speed in an hour. But half the class?  So I ponder the predicament I’m in. If as they claim, 3 were at job interviews in a neighbouring city on a snowy day where travel time was slowed, they have excellent reasons for being absent. The flu victim and the one with the flat tire both have claims beyond their control; although I do wonder why a flat tire would keep a person away the entire day. The only one with no excuse is the person who blamed the weather but didn’t take the responsibility to contact me and leave a message.

No matter the reason, I’m potentially standing in front of 12 people in 3 hours and 15 minutes, and I’ll have to know what my plan is for the day. Just as the weather tested their decision-making skills yesterday, their decision yesterday tests my own decision-making skills today.

I share this situation with you my readers, because some of you are also Workshop Facilitators and we can learn from one another. Ever had this problem? In talking with my peers at the close of the day yesterday, some would have refused the guy who didn’t call at all from attending the session entirely. That however I personally reject in this unique situation as even were I to ban him, I’d have 5 who still need some kind of orientation so what’s 1 more? He is on a short leash however (if that metaphor isn’t too offensive).

I also share this because if you are a client attending workshops, you hear a side of things that you may not have given much thought to. Those of us running such workshops do care, we plan them out with your best interests in mind and each day has something meaningful to learn. If you lose a day, not only do you mess things up for the presenter, you can’t learn in 9 days what 10 were scheduled to share. You’re short changing yourself.

We shall see how the day unfolds – and how many show up. Whatever decision I make will depend in large part on that.

Heard The One About The Guy Who Said, “I Want To Work But…”


When you hear someone say, “Heard the one about the guy who said…”, it’s usually the start of a joke. When the next 5 words are, “I want to work but…”, then it sounds like the idea of making a joke about someone looking for work is in bad taste.

It is true however – and most unfortunately so, that there are a great number of people who claim to want to work but who follow-up that statement with single or multiple barriers. The nature of those barriers are either self-imposed barriers or barriers beyond their control. Of the two, self-imposed barriers are far more common. So if then these barriers are so often self-imposed, why is it some people still make claims of wanting to work, but don’t take the steps to remove the barriers they’ve set upon themselves?

The answer is actually very simple; while they profess to wanting employment, they don’t want the employment more than they are content to live within the barriers they have constructed. So the person who wants to work but needs their high school diploma would much rather live without going back to get it, hence jeopardizing their own ability to get the work that requires the diploma. Similarly, the person who says they want to work and gets offered a job interview, declines it because it would mean having to work 15 kilometres away and in their mind that’s too far to be expected to travel every day.

In both cases above, the person states a desire to work, knows what has to be done to obtain employment, but doesn’t want the end goal of a job bad enough to in the one case, get their high school diploma and in the other travel outside some predetermined and largely arbitrary geographical boundary. How bad do they really want to work? Not bad enough.

These kind of examples work really well in the sense that most of us can see how the person is self-sabotaging themselves. We might go so far as to say, “15 kilometres? Really? Come on, that’s like a short bus ride. You’re not serious right?” Oh but they are. And it’s easy to look at someone else’s situation and gape, laugh, question, or puzzle over. But what of our situation; more directly YOUR situation? Are you equally putting up your own barriers to employment?

Suddenly the thought that someone might look your way and suggest that you are your own worst barrier to employment might not seem so funny. How dare they! How dare I. But I stand by this assertion; in many cases, the single biggest barrier to someone gaining meaningful employment is themselves.

I’ve heard some single parents say, “I want to work but I have no childcare.” Others say, “I want to work but everything is on computers these days”. There’s the classic, “I want to work but I’ve got this 15-year-old criminal record.” That one is only topped by the ever popular, “I want to work but nobody is hiring in this town.” If this was a music album, it’d be a cheesy collection of country-wailing fiddles and bluesy saxophones.

At what point does a person say to themselves, “Okay, I’ve got a situation of my own making, I’m taking responsibility for it, and the solution is also mine to own.” It’s far too easy and much more comfortable to continue on blaming others for our circumstances. In some cases, it’s even necessary quite frankly. Some current situations exist because of past situations in which we found ourselves – shady employers who duped us, maybe families who put us down and suppressed us.

At some point however, for each and every person who pulled themselves out of that “woe is me” life, a decision was made by the person themselves that enough was enough, life was passing them by, they were going to succeed where they had only ever failed, and that change – REAL CHANGE – was needed. The second thing beyond that initial decision was an equally important next step and that was to act.

If you are truly happy with your present life there is no real desire to embrace change because there is no motivation to experience things differently. If you are not happy with life as it is, you DO have the power to change how you experience it. In fact, you are the only person on the planet who can really drive that change if it’s change that’s to last.

If you are unemployed and don’t want to work, stop telling people you do. You are only going to waste both your time and theirs. Is that your goal? I would hope not. If you are sincere about wanting to make a change and gain employment, the real work is about to begin. Getting work IS work. You’ll need to update your skills, education, your appearance, self-confidence, decision-making ability, change your daily routines. It will involve struggles, setbacks but also gains, achievements and successes.

Eliminate the word, “but” from your vocabulary for starters. If you want to succeed and work, get going. “But I don’t have my grade 12!” becomes, “I’m enrolling in school”.  “But I don’t have childcare becomes, “I’m getting a sitter.” But I’ve got a criminal record!” becomes, “I’m getting a pardon”. etc.

Who said getting a job would be easy? So you have problems to overcome? It all starts with YOU.

 

 

One Way To Doom Your Jobsearch


In the middle of February, I will be facilitating yet another intensive job searching group for a couple of weeks. This is a group of twelve people; handpicked by my fellow Employment Counsellors, who have in the recent past demonstrated they are self-motivated to find employment. In addition, they must have some basic computer skills, know the kind of work they want, be prepared to come dressed professionally daily, and above all else, be open to receive constructive feedback on how to effectively improve their job searching skills.

Now in my own case, I decided at the outset of first designing this program that I wanted to invite these people via the phone to the program rather than have a clerk fire off a letter of invitation. My reasoning is that over the phone, I can check their voice message if I get a recording, I can hear if it rings forever otherwise, hear the tone of their voice, how they talk on the phone etc. Also I can gauge better their situation and determine if their situation has changed which would preclude their participation.

And in one gentlemen’s case, I have found a unique problem. Upon reviewing the file, the referring person indicated that he doesn’t always have phone access, so he should be contacted by email. Now if I were looking for work and applying for jobs I’d have an active telephone. If money was the problem and I had to rely on email, you can bet I’d have it on all day so I could hear the ‘ping’ whenever I received one, or I’d be checking it many times a day. How odd then that I emailed this fellow on Tuesday of last week and have yet to hear from him.

If this fellow should reply to me prior to the class being full and get accepted, the first of many things I would do is issue him funds to get his phone connected and active. You don’t have to be an Employment Counsellor to understand surely that if an employer finds it difficult to contact you as a potential interview candidate, they are going to move quickly on to others who are likewise qualified. This is after all, a competitive market with many qualified job seekers for almost every position advertised.

This is self-destructive behaviour which is likely to sabotage ones job search, and doom a job search to a very prolonged matter.

So let’s assume – for assumption is all we have – that this fellow has money issues and can’t afford to put money into his cell phone and has no landline. Okay, now with that premise agreed upon, it now becomes a situation that reveals a persons problem-solving skills or a lack thereof. So what would be other potential solutions if we brainstormed a bit?

Well for starters, one might borrow the money from family or friends. There’s also the option of him asking his Caseworker or Employment Counsellor for up to $30 per month in his case to restore his phone to service. Then there are phones in local resource centres and employment agencies which are free of charge. In our resource centre we even have a message service. How it works is a person puts this number on their resume, and when they come to the centre, they can ask if they’ve received calls, then call them back. No phone, no problem.

And there are other solutions too, like making the phone a priority and doing without something else even when funds are tight. Now before anyone starts to educate me on how someone on social assistance has so little funds in the first place and can’t afford to short change themselves in some other area, I know all to well how hard it is to get by on the little they receive. I am not insensitive to this situation.

But it does seem a huge waste of energy and time to send out even a single resume and apply for a job if in fact you close off the very form of contact which an employer might turn to in order to invite you in for an interview. Yes while it’s true more employers do correspond by email than in the past, some still want to make personal contact so they can quickly ascertain if you are interested, your availability, and hear any enthusiasm in your voice. Why make things harder on yourself?

If this fellow has a computer with internet access, there are more options like Skype which can put him in contact with others, and if there is no internet access or he has no computer or smartphone, he is at yet another disadvantage. Unfortunately, until such time as he initiates a response to me via email, or should happen to make contact with another staff member of the organization, I am at a loss to be able to communicate with him and sort out the nature of the problem and offer a solution.

In you own situation, may I suggest that in this age of multi-communication media, you do your very best to make yourself widely available to being contacted. If you are going to list a phone number, ensure it can receive calls and that you don’t get it so filled with messages you are unable to receive more. If you list an email, check it and respond. Be accessible!

The Human Spirit As A Resource


Think for a moment about something you want very much. Maybe it’s having a child with the person you love. Maybe it’s a log cabin nestled in some woods next to a clear blue lake with a view of orange and mauve sunsets nightly. Perhaps it’s the approval and love of a parent that’s never given you credit and respect, and always viewed you as a disappointment. If you have to pause for a few moments to think of what it is you want desperately, take a moment to do so before reading further.

Great. Got it now? Okay, and I suspect if you want it bad enough, it came to your mind rather quickly anyhow. Now, imagine if it were possible, that someone could look into your future and then told you flat-out that whatever it is you want very much right now will sadly never come to be. Would you shrug your shoulders and say, “Really? Okay, well I guess I’ll try for something else then.” Or do you suppose you might say, “Really? I may not get it in the end but I’m going to keep trying anyhow and see what happens.”

The second response is what I absolutely love about the human spirit. Our capacity – YOUR capacity – to want something so passionately that we will often strive against tremendous odds to obtain something of value when others would encourage us to give up on what it is we seek and strive for something they believe is more attainable.

And it is this journey we undertake that shapes us and defines us both to others and more importantly to ourselves. You see along any journey, there are problems to be overcome, challenges that test our resolve and force us to use our skills to bypass or work through. Sometimes those challenges are ones we can handle alone, and others would be best resolved when we draw upon the aid of those in our lives at the time.

Let’s move out of the theoretical and into the real world so this becomes clearer. As my piece began, I asked you to think consciously about something you wanted very much. Remember? I know you do. Okay so without feeling badly about how unsuccessful you’ve been so far, or beating yourself up for maybe having done very little to make it a reality, I want you now to close your eyes in a moment and just quietly visualize yourself having reached that goal and be in possession of whatever it is that you want. Think about what joy you feel, the pride of accomplishment, and the impact of having whatever it is on your future life. Close your eyes and visualize that for a moment or two now.

How did obtaining that goal feel? Pretty good I imagine. That quick little exercise if done once a day and at moments when you feel most vulnerable and tempted to give up has the power to kick-start your persistence, and if it’s important enough to you in the first place, encourage you to go on knowing that what you want is greater than the frustration of setbacks you are experiencing at the time.

In fact every setback, roadblock, challenge and problem to overcome becomes a building block that you’ll need later on when the challenges become bigger and appear too complex to handle. You see if you could fast-forward your life to facing the biggest hurdle you’re ever going to have to tackle right now, you may overwhelmed and ill-equipped to deal with the scope of the challenge. You’re not ready yet, your skills not well enough developed. That is the purpose of working through the smaller, more manageable problems you’re undergoing right now today. If you can’t solve the things you have to deal with now, the problems further along your journey will never even come up because earlier challenges stopped you cold.

But the human spirit often finds ways for everyday people like you and me to overcome things at one time we may have not believed we were capable of overcoming. So if you want the approval of a parent whose never given you credit, and a successful career of financial independence is what it will take to do that, you have the ability to make it happen and you’ve got to believe that. Asking for help and direction, support and ideas from Counsellors and Employment Advisors is how you learn the skills necessary to remove the barriers in your journey. Learning skills from others is what the wisest of us do, and do it frequently.

Now, that vision of what you want so desperately; imagine and sketch out on paper what hurdles had to be overcome shortly before you reached your goal. Then repeat this process based on what you can imagine, making educated guesses about what has to be obtained or overcome WORKING BACKWARDS. Perhaps it means a degree or diploma, before that going to school, registering before going to school, researching colleges, night schools or universities before registering. Okay so start now by researching them and move forward. This process gives you starting places so you can move forward with clear direction and chart your progress on the journey.

How strong or how badly you sincerely want your end goal; how much it really means to you, will determine your ability to tackle the challenges when things get tough. I suspect your human spirit will carry you through.

Her Vision Was Bigger Than The Barrier: Problem Solving Excellence


I am thrilled to have a very practical example of problem solving today which in addition, demonstrates an outstanding attitude. Sit yourself down and get ready to learn from an unemployed lady who not only solved a problem, but now has a fantastic story to share in an interview that demonstrates her attitude and problem-solving skills.

Let me set up the situation. This woman is looking for employment either as a Customer Service Representative or a Personal Support Worker. She contacted a Recruiter I know at my advice who received her resume for each (for she sent her two). Yesterday as she arrived half an hour early for the supported job search group I’m running, I told her about a possible short-term job the Recruiter had come across her desk. The Recruiter had emailed me and asked if I thought she would be good for it as the two had yet to actually meet or speak on the phone, and of course I said I thought she would be ideal.

There was in my mind only one concern and that was she has no car. The job you see is only a three-day position, and she’d need to get to a train station in the area and hand out gift card to commuters. The position would pay $16 per hour, but the bad news was that she had to be there from 4:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. each day. Now many would turn down a job like this flat. 3 days? 4:30 a.m.? 4 1/2 hours only?

Ah, but this lady thinks like I do. She jumped at it because she could see past the financial. This job wasn’t actually about the money at all. What it is about is demonstrating to the Recruiter who doesn’t know anything about her other than the resume before her, that she can solve problems, will be dependable, and the three days are nothing more than an audition for the next and better job. The Recruiter doesn’t want to jeopardize her own relationship with employers with longer term needs, so she’s seeing how the woman performs.

So with no car, here’s what she did on her own. First she called to determine if buses were running that early and found they don’t. Then she called a cab company and found a ride there and back would be $20 each way; a $120 fare for the three days. Then she looked into a three-day car rental and it would be $117. Still, she’d gross $217 she figured and still come out with about $100 from the job. It got even better when she realized she’d only need the expense of the cab to get there, and then she could take a bus home because they would be on the road by 9:00 a.m.

I haven’t mentioned it, but she’s on social assistance and making only $4.36 per hour by comparison. So now she has a way to get to the job and resolved that herself, will come out financially better for taking the three-day assignment, and more importantly she will be demonstrating the whole time that she is reliable, and can do the job. Now this work is so short in duration, I don’t recommend she include it on a future resume. I do however, suggest that she does consider using the story in a job interview if she is asked to demonstrate a time when she resolved a problem.

Over a long period, this position wouldn’t be practical. However, not only does this do all the above, but for someone who hasn’t heard, “Yes, you’re hired!” in a while, something a small as this can be extremely good for the ego. “I’m wanted”. There is a rise in self-esteem, relief that a newly crafted resume and cover letter supported by contacting a Recruiter all are paying off.

I don’t know nor can I say for sure that the job over the three days will lead to anything else. There is no guarantee. I do know for certain though that she has demonstrated to me, the Recruiter, her classmates and most importantly to herself, that she could see the bigger picture than just seeing the job itself.

There are so many benefits to this story. When the class assembles this morning, I will be presenting them with two different problems and dividing them into two groups. They will be asked to brainstorm and present options for resolving the two problems. Problems you see, are usually progress stoppers for many who don’t have good problem resolution ideas. And to be honest, many of those I deal with make poor choices, quick decisions they later regret, and most importantly, don’t ask for input from those around them from whom they could get other ideas and possible solutions. This results in jobs passed on, opportunities lost, and they can’t always be resolved because the damage is beyond repair as in quitting a job they could have kept.

It boils down many a time to, “How bad do you want it?” If you want something like a job bad enough, (and that means seeing the real value beyond the short-term money), you’ll find a way. If you don’t, you won’t.

I hope you like me, think this story is a practical example of problem-solving. The three-day job could be an end in itself or the start of a life-changing chain reaction about to happen. Fingers crossed for her….