One Tip For Your Resume


When you’re crafting your resume and targeting it to a single, specific job posting, it is recommended that you include a profile statement. This much most people know. What you may not know is how beneficial it is to compose this when you’ve completed all other sections of the resume.

You see by the time you go back to writing the profile statement, you have a much stronger understanding of what the employer is in need of and a clearer idea of the applicant’s strengths, personal suitability, skills and experience. In other words, you’ll craft a more enticing profile statement and that alone will send the message to the reader that it’s in their own best interests to read on.

In the receding past, it was fashionable and appropriate to simple have an objective at the outset of your resume; located immediately below your contact information. Typically this was where applicants put a single line, communicating what they were after and sometimes even why. They often read some version of, “Seeking a full-time position as a ________ where I can use my ________ skills.”

The reason objective statements have fallen out of favour with employers is specifically because those kind of objective statements were solely about what the applicant wanted. Employers as we know, are not interested in knowing what you want and how they can help you meet your goals. They will be eventually of course, but only once you’re part of the organization. Then yes, good employers will want to know how they can support your development and make you a more valued commodity which means increasing your productivity.

However, at the point when you’re applying to work for an organization, they don’t know the first thing about you and as such, have no commitment to developing your skills. It’s all about the employer’s needs and how you as the applicant are going to respond to their needs. How does bringing you onboard resolve a staffing need? If you keep this in mind as you compose your profile statement, the end result comes out as here’s what I can do for you as opposed to here’s what you can do for me.

The best resume profile statements use some of the key words from the job posting’s qualifications section. Ah, but not to be overlooked is the preamble of the posting. There are hints buried in the, “What you’ll do”, and “What we’re looking for” sections of many job ads. Too many applicants skip or skim these sections at best and zoom right in on the qualifications.

So today I give you this one piece of advice: write the profile last.

This is especially beneficial if you are in the business of helping others craft their resumes. You will gain little insights into the people themselves as you sit with them during the resume crafting experience. You’ll pick up valuable information as you ask for details of what they’ve done in the past and what they’ve accomplished. You come to understand what’s important to them and you end up having a much better idea of their value proposition. By the time you return to the profile statement, you know two things better than when you started; the job being applied to and the person you’ve partnered with in writing the resume for.

Hope that single tip helps you in strengthening the opening of your resume. If you’re looking for work in 2020, a sincere wish that you meet with the success you’re after.