Know A Frustrated Job Seeker? Please Share This


If you know someone who is out of work and they’ve become bitter, frustrated and just plain angry with their lack of success at getting interviews and job offers, consider doing them a favour and share this blog/post with them. Remember saying to them, “I wish there was something I could do to help you”? Well, this is that thing.

Hey there, hello. Please give this post a read. It might even help to read it over more than once. The person who has shared this with you cares enough that they brought this to your attention in the hopes of helping you get some results from your job search. I hope this is worth your time; 900 words so here we go…

First of all there’s this tool employers are starting to use more and more that’s keeping you from getting in to the interview stage called Applicant Tracking System software. Let’s call it ATS for short. You know as I do that for every advertised job there are an awful lot of people submitting resumes. Some resumes are from qualified people, some from desperate people who don’t stack up and of course there are overly qualified people too because they’ve become desperate too. With all these people hoping to get in and impress interviewers in person, they just can’t read over every résumé.

So this software basically scans the resumes – all of them – and sorts them into those that meet the needs of the organization and those that don’t. Your problem could be that even though you are 100% qualified for the jobs you are applying to, unfortunately the software is screening you out. So what’s happening is you see a job you really want and one that you’re a perfect fit for. You send your résumé and then wait with some confidence for the phone to ring and it never does. You don’t even get the courtesy of contact. The result? You just don’t know where you could have gone wrong, and you get discouraged, mad, extremely frustrated and it’s all because you can’t figure out how to get to meet people and sell them on your skills, qualifications and experience. You’ve become disillusioned and at times just want to give up.

Don’t give up on yourself; when you do feel like giving up remember why you started looking for work in the first place. It’s not YOU that employer’s are rejecting, it’s that résumé with your credentials on it; that resume or CV is the problem. So what you need to learn and understand is how to get past the software and on to the short list of people to interview.

So what employer’s are doing is making job postings which state what they are looking for in the people they want to interview. You may not want to do what I’m going to suggest – your choice of course – but please consider trying it. Grab yourself a highlighter. Now with the highlighter, pick out all the key words and phrases in the job posting – the things the employer has said they want applicants to have. Don’t highlight the entire sentence in the job posting, just the key words in the sentences. Do this now.

Okay done? You should have a job posting that’s now got many highlighted words and phrases. What you’ve just done is the key first step; understanding exactly what the employer has identified as their desired qualifications. The next step is just as crucial. Now what you’ve got to do is make sure that the highlighted words appear on your résumé. Here’s how. Every time you add a word or phrase to your résumé that matches what you highlighted, take a pen and put a check mark over the highlighted word on the job posting; not at the start of the sentence but right on top of the words.

As you do this, you’ll become more confident that what the employer’s looking for is now on your résumé; you’ve become a better fit. If you pulled out a résumé you’ve sent in for jobs in the past and you still have the job ads you replied to, I’ll bet that you’ll see that on paper you didn’t match up very well.

Now, so far good for you. You’ve improved your chances, but there’s more. That software they use can’t make sense of certain things you’re resume might contain. First of all it can only read certain fonts (the size and style of the letters you type). Ariel size 12 is one standard style and size it does read so even though it’s pretty basic, use it.

This software can’t read anything in italics, you know when the letters are slanted like this. Then there are things like putting boxes around certain sections or even the entire page – it won’t read anything in the boxes. Neither does it read underlined text and if you’re using a template anywhere in your résumé, remove it because it doesn’t read this either.

This means for each job you apply to you should be making up a different resume; one that addresses all the key words and phrases for that single job ad. Sounds like a lot of work but it really isn’t and you’ll start getting better results.

Look it’s tough getting ahead; which is precisely why I’m hoping you find this helpful. All the best in the job search.

 

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Want To Be A Great Employment Counsellor?


Now and again I hear people say to me, “I’m sure I could do your job; it doesn’t look that hard.”

That comment is one I take with a smile and usually respond with, “Thank you! I’m succeeding then in making it look effortless when in fact it takes a lot of preparation, planning, skills, experience and mental energy. If you’re ready to put in all the effort to continually get better every day, why not?”

Like any profession, you’ll find Employment Counsellors of varying abilities; some strong, others learning the ropes, many improving and some stagnating and using out-of-date techniques. Why should this field be any different from others?

Let me share what I believe are some of the key qualities, skills and traits which many of the very best of us hold. It’s a list that’s open to debate, but here’s at least this professionals take on the job from someone in the position. Please comment and indicate if you’re in the field now, in training to join us, receiving the help of an Employment Counsellor yourself or are considering the field. Dialogue and comments can be very productive!

  1. A good listener. While we hear similar stories from those we aid, no two people have exactly the same background and their path to the present is unique. The best of us remember that and listen attentively; picking up on the person’s interests, motivators, barriers real and perceived, hopes, goals and dreams. When we actively listen in the moment, we engage and establish credibility and hear what we’d otherwise miss.
  2. A positive influence. We often meet people in periods of desperation, frustration and hopelessness. It is imperative that we remind ourselves of the stress and pressure people are under. The faith they place in our ability to help; whether great or small is what we must take and work with. There’s great potential in those we help and we must through our actions bring out the best by encouraging and above all providing hope. We must influence action with positivity.
  3. Enthusiastic. Ah if you know me you just know this has to be in the list. Enthusiasm is contagious and infectious. I think it safe to say that most if not all learners hope to be in the presence of a teacher or mentor who goes about imparting their knowledge with energy and enthusiasm. Enthusiasm means we embody and display the most desirable trait employers themselves are looking for in the people they interview; enthusiasm!
  4. Knowledgeable. Broadly speaking, all learners hope that those they learn from are sharing best practices, state of the art techniques and what is proven to work. The best of us are never above doing self-checks, reaching out to our colleagues, continuing to grow and learn ourselves. This is self-investment that keeps us relevant, imparting not what we believe works but rather what we know works; and yes there is a difference.
  5. Creatively flexible. Now here’s a key piece! The great in this profession know that when we identify a person’s needs, responding to them in a way that the person will both comprehend and come to own mean we may have to use a number of strategies to get the message through. How we were successful with one person doesn’t mean the same delivery will work with others. Our approach may have to be as unique as the people we help. Rather than expecting the learner to conform to our own style, we often change our approach to reach others where we find them.
  6. An appreciation of service. Just as we expect to receive great customer service when we are the customer, exceptional Employment Counsellors know that we are essentially service providers ourselves. We therefore practice good customer service skills; deliver on what we promise, work to satisfy both the customers wants and needs, share tips, advice and assure our availability when needed after service.
  7. Honest feedback. Great Employment Counsellors give honest feedback on what they see. Be it a résumé needing an overhaul, hearing self-defeating language in a mock interview or observing poor hygiene and clothing issues, a trusting relationship with those we serve will best allow us to provide the critical feedback that people need to hear. The best deliver this feedback from a helping perspective, choosing words with sensitivity but saying what needs to be said. Honest feedback can get to the heart of a problem quicker than dancing around an issue and wasting their time.
  8. Praising. The best praise when needed, ensuring the praise is legitimate not fabricated. We find what is good in others, encouraging them to do more of what is working in a person’s favour. Positive reinforcement of good behaviours, praising effort even when success isn’t necessarily forthcoming sets people up to eventually realize their goals. Remember looking for work is fraught with ups and downs, highs and lows, raised expectations and dashed hopes. As an Employment Counsellor, you just might be THE one person they are hanging all their hopes on until they can once again be self-sufficient.

So there you have it; a short list of some the essentials needed to be not just a good Employment Counsellor but a great one. And why not aspire to be the best you can be? Whether a Coach or Counsellor, the best look to get better and see room for self-improvement always.

Thoughts?

Hate Resumes? This Is For You


So you’re looking for work or looking for a different job. That’s great news and I commend you for making a good decision to improve on your financial health; the job you are looking for will hopefully make things a whole lot better for you both in your wallet and in how you spend your time.

All that stands in your way of getting a job offer it would seem is getting to meet the people who make the hiring decisions in the places you’d like to work. The thing is of course; and it’s easy to overlook – there are a lot of other people who are also hoping to meet the people who make the hiring decisions in the same places you want to work. Not only are you applying, but so are others. In fact, it’s the case these days that employers get about 75 – 150 applications for each job they advertise. That’s a lot of people competing for their attention!

I’ve sat down with two people this week who are looking for work and they couldn’t have greater differences of opinions when it comes to the value of resumes and how to go about looking for work. Let me tell you about each of them and you’ll see two different attitudes; and I assure you both are very real people, not just made up to make a point.

The first was a man in his 20’s with an extensive criminal record who has only ever worked under the table and done some volunteer work. He’s muscular, done general labour in the construction field and even a little cooking here and there. His job ambition? Anything. His thoughts on resumes? A waste of time and useless. He’s anti-resume because quite frankly he doesn’t like the idea of making one and doesn’t have the skills required to make one; skills like keyboarding, formatting, computer skills in general. What he doesn’t like he has no patience for.

When it came to putting together his resume, he sat beside me and actually told me to just make up stuff. “You know what to put down so just say I’ve worked at some places; it doesn’t matter if it’s true or not.” He wanted one resume just to send to his Social Services Worker who strongly suggested he get one, but he wasn’t planning on using it at all, hence the lack of regard for what was on it. When completed, he sent one copy to her and walked out with none for himself – in fact he refused to take one. His plan? Go to job sites all over town and introduce himself in person until somebody would hire him.

Surprisingly, this might actually work for him. Someone will look at his muscles and plan to use him for the grunt work until he either injures himself, quits, returns to jail or they lay him off for the winter. He’ll be trapped in an entry-level, physically tough job with little chance of advancement and all the while becoming increasingly bitter and angered about his situation in life. His choice though.

The other is a woman with one child also in her 20’s. She sat down with me and said right off the top that she was here for help as she knows her resume is flawed and she wants to learn how to make it better.

First thing we did is quickly find a job she actually wanted to apply for using the internet which took us all of 4 minutes. An excellent investment in time. Next we targeted her skills and qualifications on the resume to match the job requirements for the position she wanted. Again and again as we went through her resume line by line she said things like, “I get it now, ugh, I can’t believe I made so many mistakes. I thought it was at least okay but now I see how I’ve been coming across to employers. No wonder I wasn’t getting anywhere.”

It takes a wise person to see how they’ve been making mistakes, admit those mistakes and then take the steps to eliminate making those mistakes moving forward. This woman is such a person. She not only left with a strong resume for the job she wanted to apply to, she left knowing how to change and edit that resume for any subsequent job she wanted to apply to; even if those other jobs had exactly the same title.

Look, I want you to be successful. I want you to use your time productively; not just making resume after resume without any success. I want you to make strong resumes that will get employers interested in meeting with you (interviews) so you can sell yourself in-person and then get an offer of employment. Then of course, you will no longer need to make a resume until such time as you want a promotion or different job to improve your happiness at work and your finances.

So here’s good advice for those smart enough to take it; don’t get someone to make a resume for you – get an employment professional to make one WITH you – someone who will empower you so you’ll know how to do it on your own in the future. This way, you won’t be dependent on someone every time you apply for a job. Put in the effort, pay attention and learn how to make a resume with a good attitude.

Getting Help With Your Resume? Think On This


As an Employment Counsellor, I constantly get asked the question, “Will you help me do my resume?” I have learned that for some people at any rate, what the question they are really asking me is, “Will you do my resume?” They omit the key words, “help me”.

I can tell you that the quality of the resume which is produced at the end is greatly influenced by the proximity and involvement of the person whose name is at the top of the page. If I do that resume on my own without the person beside me, it will turn out good but it won’t be as great as it could be. If on the other hand the person is on –hand and can add some insights and provides me with information that I can then incorporate into the document, the quality is markedly better.

Furthermore I have to add that one of the most satisfying things about helping someone out is the sharing of the methodology itself. Just, doing it for them certainly gives them what they wanted – an end product. However, working on it together and doing it with them empowers the person who through the process learns how to do future resumes themselves. Empowering others is something I find great satisfaction in.

Without being  present  and assisting in the creation of the resume, you’ll only see the final product and miss the thought process involved. Often a person will look at a document and be immediately impressed; they feel genuinely good about themselves on paper – as I would hope they would. However, that same resume doesn’t always generate the desired result – a job interview. The reason is that the resume I’ve constructed doesn’t match up with a specific job as well as it could because without the person’s input, the words I’ve selected to use or the skills I’ve highlighted are close but not the best they could be.

So I put it to you that if you are going to employ the help of an Employment Counsellor, Job Coach, Resume Writer or any other professional to assist you in making a resume that you stay involved. This is your best chance at ending up with a resume that not only looks good but will ultimately garner you more results. You don’t really know what you’ve got until the resume is out there and you see whether it gets you interviews or not after all.

Understand that resume writing has changed over the years. Years ago if you had someone make a resume for you, they would charge you a certain amount and for that you’d get maybe 20 or 30 copies of the same document. You’d then spread those precious resumes around and hope to get some results. Here in 2016, most professionals know that the resume they produce is targeted to one single job – not a single type of job you understand – just one job posting. If you want to apply for a second job, you don’t just submit the same resume you’ve had created. You would modify the resume you have slightly or greatly to match the specific needs of the second employer; even when the second job has the same job title as the first. Not everybody understands this message.

I had a fellow recently ask me to help him with his resume. Again, what he really meant was do it for him completely in his absence. When I asked him if he’d be willing to meet with me to do it together, he said, “Why would I be there? You’re the expert; I’d just be watching you. No, I’ll wait for you to finish it.” As much as I tried to explain the benefit of being in the process with me, he wasn’t interested in learning how to do it for himself, but only in having it done for him. I imagine that if he gets the job interview he is hoping for he’ll thank me. However, I also imagine that if the job interview isn’t forthcoming, he’ll rationalize that I’m not such the expert I think I am, and he’ll point the finger of blame in my direction instead of re-considering that his presence could have improved the final product.

No matter who you get to assist you with your resume, commit some time to go through the process with the person.

I caution you against using the services – especially if you’re paying the person – of someone who prefers or insists on doing it without you around. A lot of people on the internet are happy to take your money and send you a resume. Resist the temptation of these providers; go for locally done by someone who walks through the creation process with you. When you pay for someone to help you make a resume whom you’ll never meet, they can never produce a document as effective as someone with the same talent who meets you in person.

A good resume has to use your language, express things as you’d express them in an interview. Employers can spot a resume made by someone else easily if the person applying and the resume don’t match up. This can make you look dishonest or at the very least disingenuous; and as you should know, honesty is a highly coveted value employers hold.

“Proofread My Resume Please?”


If you ask someone to proofread your resume, you have to be open and receptive to the possibility that they will find mistakes. If you’re going to argue and defend your errors instead of correcting them, you’re not only wasting the time of the person doing the proofreading, you’re also risking their willingness to provide you with honesty.

Yesterday I had two very different experiences with two different people in the drop in Employment Resource Centre where I work. The first was with a fellow who was applying for employment with the Province of Ontario; which meant there were very specific instructions on how to submit an application; not only in terms of the resume, but also with respect to his cover letter and how to apply.

This gentleman approached me with his initial resume and to be honest it was extremely poorly constructed. It contained irregular spacing, multiple fonts; the content was weak and didn’t relate to the job he was applying for at all. Had he submitted this version of his resume it wouldn’t even have got more than a glance let alone led to the offer of an interview.

During the course of what was a fairly busy morning for me personally assisting a number of people, he would make revisions based on my suggestions and then approach me again for further feedback. He did this five times, and with every presentation, he was getting closer to a stronger application; not to mention his basic understanding of how to make a resume in general was becoming stronger. It was precisely because he was genuinely appreciative of the feedback that he was offered more and more. In short, he took the advice he sought out and implemented the changes; never getting frustrated but learning from the experience and implementing the ideas he received.

Now I contrast his experience with another person who approached me much later in the day. This woman approached me and said she was applying for a job and would I like to read over her cover letter, resume and list of references. I looked at the cover letter first only because it was on top of the resume. The initial sentence began, “I am submitting my Resume…”

I stopped reading and pointed out that the capital letter ‘R’ in the word resume should be lower case not a capital, and she said to me, “Well I’m not going to change it now. I’ve gone back to this cover letter that worked for me years ago so we’ll see.” I stopped proofreading the cover letter right there and looked at the resume.

The resume wasn’t a disaster at first glance, but it was missing the most recent two years on it. When I asked about that she said, “Oh this is a resume from two years ago, I’m just sending it the way it is.” I shuffled the papers and moved to the list of references. Now this document looked fine. It only contained three names instead of a standard four, but there were titles and contact information so it looked appropriate. However, just as I was about to say it was fine, she voluntarily said, “The first guy is dead but I’m leaving him on there.”

I put all three sheets down and said, “You’re intentionally leaving a dead person on your list of references instead of replacing him with someone else who can actually be contacted and speak to your experience?” She told me that she was indeed, because – and you guessed it – it worked years ago so she was using it again.

So what’s the point of asking someone for their feedback if you aren’t open to hearing what they’ve got to say, or are going to actually implement any of the changes they recommend? I told her in summing things up that there were problems with all three documents and that she really should make some changes to them if she wanted to improve her odds of getting an interview. I added however that it didn’t appear she was ready to make any changes at this time, so I wasn’t going to get into identifying all the corrections needed.

Now ironically, the woman might get further with her resume than the fellow. There is the possibility that because he is applying for a government position, the competition will be fierce and others extremely qualified. Sheer numbers could keep him from advancing to the interview stage. The woman may get an interview as she’s applying for a job through a mutual friend. The scrutiny that each application is going under is very different. While the employer may look over her resume and have her in for an interview as a favour to her friend, the fellow has no such connection, and if he gets an interview, he earned it entirely.

Look, the bottom line is that it’s wise to ask for others to proofread your work, and both get full marks for asking. However, it’s equally essential that you stay open to the help you get and consider the advice of people who are doing you a favour. Otherwise you are wasting your time and theirs; showing little respect for the time and opinions of others.

Can you get an interview with flawed documents full of grammar and spelling errors? Sure you can; it is possible. Is it likely? No. Act on advice and improve your odds.

Your Experience With Resumes Please!


Hello reader! I have a request to make of you; if you would be so kind as to help me out. The team of Employment Counsellors I am part of is in the process of re-examining the topic of resumes. We’re looking at everything including format, content, construction and we’re also looking at how we deliver our resume workshop itself.

I’m hoping that after reading this piece, you might do me the great favour of providing some feedback to me given your own experience; feedback that I can bring to the discussion we’ll be having. I will appreciate all the feedback I receive of course, but I am especially interested in hearing from three groups: those holding Human Resource positions in companies who receive resumes, other Resume Experts, and you Job Seekers.

Here are some questions for each group of people to get you thinking:

Human Resource Personnel

  • Are you using Applicant Tracking Software?
  • What makes an effective resume?
  • What are you looking for in terms of content and layout?
  • Comment on the use of italics, fonts, white space, borders, boxes, lines etc.
  • What are your pet peeves; the turn-offs?
  • What advice would you pass on to make your job easier and find the right people?

Resume Experts

  • Do you deliver your advice 1:1, group facilitation or both?
  • How long do you typically take with an individual to produce their resume?
  • What headings and format do you use and why?
  • If you deliver resume workshops, what do those workshops look like?
  • Do you seek out the input from employers and if so how often?

Job Seekers

  • What’s been your experience with your resumes?
  • If you got help with your resume, what advice did you receive?
  • How would you like to receive help making your resume?
  • What did you learn that you hadn’t considered before?
  • Did the help you received produce more interviews?
  • Do you want a resume done for you or do you care to learn how to do it yourself?

Please don’t limit yourself to the questions I’ve posed above. If you have some insight into the resume experience to share I would be most grateful to hear whatever you have to say – and in your own words. While I have definitive opinions on the subject, and feel I’ve got expertise in resume writing, I know and understand the benefit of receiving input; especially from key stakeholders such as the three groups I’ve identified. Allow me to be the student and teach me what you know.

I’d also be most grateful if you would pass this piece on to those you know who might be willing to provide me with some feedback that I may not normally come in contact with. When responding, perhaps you could self-identify your position; Job Seeker, HR Professional, Resume Expert, Job Coach, etc. Whether you choose to identify yourself or request to remain anonymous, I will respect that request when pulling things together. It will be enough for me to identify your role, not necessarily the company you work for – unless of course you want that information known. You could even say you work with a large, medium or small company in the __________ sector. That would be interesting.

If there is sufficient feedback, I will share what I compile in some future piece; and if you prefer to email me personally rather than respond to this blog, you may do so using kelly.mitchell@durham.ca  or hobbitzaboo@hotmail.ca ; my work and individual emails.

My team is made up of Employment Counsellors who both deliver workshops and provide front-line assistance in an Employment Resource Drop-in Centre. We deliver workshops on life skills, job coaching, learning to use computers, interview skills, resumes, WHMIS, managing stress and frustration, self-esteem and career exploration.

My motive in asking you my reader for your expertise and feedback is that in order to remain relevant and best serve the people we assist, I believe it is critical to reach out and get feedback periodically so that the design and process we employ moving forward is responsive to current trends, meets core needs, and produces desired results.

You are the experts! I am confident you have a voice to be heard and have some valuable thoughts to be put into the mix. I’d love to hear your stories, your experiences – the good and the poor. What’s it like out there at your end? If you’re out of work or in the process of making a career change, what’s been your experience with resumes and job applications?  If you’re on the receiving end, how do you decide on which resumes lead to job interview offers and which are rejected?

Are resumes changing? Are they even necessary? If your organization isn’t using resumes what is it you are using or moving toward implementing that might take their place?

On my end, I’ll do my best to take whatever feedback I receive and consider it all. If I can rely on you my readers to share a little of your experience, this could be a wonderful way for me to come to the table with what is really happening, “out there”.

A big thank you in advance for both your ongoing support and your anticipated participation. Whether it’s a line or two, a lengthy email and several attachments or some stories sharing your experience, it’s all appreciated. Let’s work with the end of February as a deadline.

Thanks people.

Reassessing A First Impression


To look at him, he certainly didn’t make a positive first impression. He needed a haircut, needed to trim that attempt at a beard, and the clothes he had on didn’t fit properly, nor were they clean. The resume he asked me to look at and help him improve was even worse. Spelling errors, terrible grammar, irregular spacing – it was just plain awful.

However, I look back on my encounter with this young fellow and find I like him.

He had walked in with his girlfriend a little uncertain, approached me at the staff desk with hesitation, and as I said, asked if he could get some help making his resume better. Didn’t ask me to do it you understand, asked me to help him.  I give a lot of credit to people who recognize their weaknesses and seek out help. And make no mistake; I knew I could help long before he showed me the resume. I had the same feeling as the folks at home improvement stores must have when I approach the counter for help. It’s not that I look completely helpless, but I’m convinced they can tell I’m not a renovation expert just the same.

Now the thing about working in a drop-in Resource Centre is that when it’s your turn to work there, you deal with whatever and whoever walks in the door. Other times I might be conducting a workshop or working 1:1 with a client, but in the drop-in area, you can be run off your feet or continuously busy helping others – both sometimes on the same day too.

I could have told him the same thing a colleague apparently told him previously; that he should show up at our Resume Writing workshop on Fridays. In other words, leave now and come back Friday. Why would I do that though? Sorry if you disagree but I believe it is incumbent on me to help the guy standing right in front of me in the here and now. I had the time, so provide the help the guy was asking for – especially when it’s what I’m paid to do! Isn’t that putting the person’s needs front and center? What ‘lesson’ would I be teaching him otherwise?

So I looked at it and there wasn’t a single thing – not a single thing – that didn’t need changing. Multiple spelling errors, poor grammar, irregular spacing, varying fonts and dates and bullets didn’t line up correctly. The woman at his side complimented him well; they made a nice couple; she very quiet, paid complete attention to the changes and suggestions I made, held his hand and both of them slowly started to grasp some of the basics of putting together a stronger resume.

This is the single thing I liked about them above all else; they listened, they were focused, and they made a genuine effort to comprehend ideas that were new to them. I checked twice giving them the perfect opportunity to have me just do it instead of going through the long but educational process they were sitting through. Each time however, the fellow asked me to keep going, keep explaining the things I was doing, and he showed evidence of comprehending what was new to him and sometimes made comments that proved some new ideas were sticking. The more engaged they were in the process of learning; the more I wanted to give them.

You see the two of them had thought I’d just fix up the spelling and give them a generic resume which he could hand out to any employer. The idea of targeting the resume to meet the specific requirements of a specific job posting had never occurred to either of them. With every key word or job requirement found on the posting which I replicated on his resume, he saw how the overall impact was a stronger resume with a better chance of getting him an interview.

Only once were we interrupted while I provided help to another client. When I returned to the resume after a two minute absence, there they both were, talking about the resume, how I was creating it and how it made sense to them. When I sat down, he said, “Thanks a lot; I really appreciate your help.” He may not have a great education, he may have a learning disability for all I know and literacy issues, but the man has good manners. Turns out the fellow has his grade 12, 2 jobs in the past and 4 years’ as an Army Cadet. That time as an Army Cadet no doubt provided him with some discipline, some structure, some respect for authority and those qualities might just appeal to employers to bolster his chances.

Reserve final judgement when you interact or work with people; sometimes they can surprise you; impress you; if you give them the chance. As in my experience here, check your first impression of others as you interact and confirm or alter your original thoughts.

We should strive to be open, be willing to meet people where they are, speak with them using their words but most importantly listen. Hearing others is essential. One of the biggest frustrations people often express is not being heard, not being acknowledged, not being listened to.

The weaknesses we see in others should not inhibit our abilities to see strengths in the same people.